10 Parks That Tell Women’s Stories

From the first women’s rights activists in the U.S. to the most memorable first ladies, these national park sites tell the stories of women who have greatly impacted our history.

Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, Washington, D.C.

Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, Washington, D.C.

This new national monument, designated in 2016, tells the story of the fight for women’s suffrage in America. Home to the National Woman's Party, many historic photos, artifacts, and stories can be found at this site.
Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park, CA

Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park, CA

This site tells the stories of American civilians, including many women, who took up jobs in factories and shipyards to produce munitions and war supplies during WWII. This time and place in history helped integrate women into the American workforce.
Lowell National Historical Park, MA

Lowell National Historical Park, MA

The water-powered textile mills of Lowell helped launch our nation into a new industrial era and provided employment for many women as factory workers. Early women's rights activists in Lowell led strikes for fair wages and better work conditions, and fought for women's right to vote, greatly contributing to the feminism movement in America.
Harriet Tubman National Historical Park, NY

Harriet Tubman National Historical Park, NY

Harriet Tubman is an American hero who is well known for helping dozens of slaves escape and find freedom. Her incredible story is told at this New York park, where you can visit her residence as well as the cemetery at which she is buried.
Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, VA

Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, VA

Maggie Walker, a newspaper editor and the first female bank president, devoted her life to advancements for Jim Crow-era African Americans and women. Particularly, she fought for equal educational and economic opportunities for these populations.
First Ladies National Historic Site, OH

First Ladies National Historic Site, OH

This site explores how the role of first lady has evolved, and how the women who have held this position have shaped American society. From detailed biographies to quirky fun facts, this site has everything you need to know about the women who have helped guide this nation.
Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, NY

Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, NY

This site honors perhaps the most influential first lady. As a distinguished advocate for human rights, Eleanor transformed the role and brought women’s social reform to the national agenda for the first time. In the relaxed atmosphere of Val-Kill's 181 acres and stone cottage, Eleanor and Franklin gathered advisors, reformers, foreign dignitaries, and even movie stars to address pressing issues of the times. Photo Credit: GPA Photo Archive
Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, Washington, DC

Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, Washington, DC

Mary McLeod Bethune spent her whole life fighting for racial and gender equality, including founding the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. This historic site preserves the first headquarters of the NCNW and tells the story of this inspiring woman.
Women’s Rights National Historical Park, NY

Women’s Rights National Historical Park, NY

This park tells the story of the first Women’s Rights Convention, held in Seneca Falls in 1848. This was the first convention to further women’s rights in society and founded the basis of a fight for equality that continues today.
Clara Barton National Historic Site, MD

Clara Barton National Historic Site, MD

A hospital nurse during the Civil War, Clara Barton went on to found the American Red Cross. This historic site explores her life and the role she played in pioneering the fields of first aid and emergency preparedness.

Photos: NPS