Buddy Bison’s Buzz September Update

Fund Your Dream Park Trip

Is there a park you dream of visiting? Talk to your school about applying to the Kids to Parks Day National School Contest! Title I schools can enter and win up to $1,000 to fund a dream park experience.

The deadline for entries is Thursday, February 14, 2019. Winners will be announced on NPT’s website Thursday, March 7, 2019.

Learn more about the contest, download the entry form, and watch our school video from last year! Questions? Contact Katie Zimmerman, (katie@parktrust.org) or call 301-279-7275. If you would like to help sponsor this program, contact Rebecca Hansell, rebecca@parktrust.org.

 

 

Getting Hands-on Learning in the Great Outdoors

 

Last month, I shared the outdoor adventures of some our 2018 Kids to Parks Day School Contest winners. Now, let’s take a dive into the incredible hands-on learning that happens when you step out of the classroom and into your local park! Maybe these experiences can inspire your own contest entry.

Photo courtesy of Cody Perry.

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Reserve is a maze of lava fields, caves, and sagebrush steppes. Tendoy Elementary’s (ID) 5th graders explored the unique volcanic geology of this national park unit by hiking and enjoying ranger-led hands-on experiments. They saw firsthand how volcanoes can explode by making a “rocket” out of Alka-seltzer and vinegar!

Craters of the Moon was the best field trip, and best place I’ve ever been to,said 5th grader Callen. “With all of the sights, sounds, and caves, those things made Craters of the Moon so much better. I learned a lot. Like, the huge dried up lava grounds are called the Great Rift! I loved reading the signs and getting information about the areas the signs talked about. I hope to visit Craters of the Moon again!”


 

Photo courtesy of Meghan Hess Shamdasani.

Have you ever thought about being a scientist? SouthTech Academy’s (FL) high schoolers did a large project investigating the impact of plastic waste on their local seashore. They researched the different kinds of plastics in the oceans and participated in a class survey studying which straw people would choose once they knew its environmental effect. Then they traveled to Juno Beach and picked up trash along the shore. They discovered that what they learned in class is correct in real life! Afterwards, the students toured the Loggerhead Marinelife Center and saw the sea life that can be affected by trash in the ocean. All of the kids went home with a greater sense of what they can do to help.

I have become more self-aware about what [impact] my decisions have on my surroundings,” said one of the students. “Helping to clean Juno Beach has inspired me to want to help our community because being able to make a difference in our community can also make a difference around the world. If we clean the beaches then less trash and plastics can enter the ocean and be spread somewhere around the world. I also learned that just by educating people we can make a difference to help better our environment and our society. Now I want to help educate more people on ways they can help to better our environment.”


Photo courtesy of Krista Gordon.

3rd graders from Alderwood ES (WA) and the 4th grade of Cozier ES (WA) asked a big question before going on their field trip to Lime Kiln Point State Park: “How will I apply what I learn to make a difference where I live?” Their field trip was part of a lesson on “how societies interact with the natural world.”

At the park, the students observed how different types of soil and rock can filter pollutants. They also discovered creatures that live in tidal pools in the park. Finally, they hiked to the 19th-century lime kiln that gave the park its name. Cozier ES even spotted the orca pod they’d adopted!

“This was the first time on a ferry and to the islands for many of the students and parents. I wish you could see their eyes pop and their squeals of delight with each new vista they saw, each new discovery they made, or each new fact they learned,” said Krista Gordon, coordinator for the schools’ Salish Sea Experience. “When students are in the right place, it is an experience they will never forget. It inspires them to become stewards. It is exciting to see this younger generation come alive and understand they make a difference. It is reason for hope that we can learn to take care of this amazing planet.”

Give Back to your Park on Public Lands Day

The 25th Annual Public Lands Day is coming to a park near you on September 22, 2018!

For the last several years, I’ve celebrated the National Environmental Education Foundation’s Public Lands Day along with National Park Trust, National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and too many other partners to count!

National Public Lands Day (NPLD) is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands. Many federal public lands like national parks are FREE to enter on this day. Find an NPLD event [insert link] or use NPT’s Park Finder map [insert link] to find a great National Park Service site near you.

There are many ways you can participate this year! Check out some of our favorite ideas below:

  • Visit a national park for free.
  • Volunteer and receive a fee-free day coupon to be used on a future date. Find participating parks
  • Share your favorite outdoor activity on social media channel with the hashtag #NPSVolunteer, #FindYourPark and #NPLD. Don’t forget to tag #BuddyBison too!

Can’t make it to a park on September 22nd? You can have a “distance learning adventure” instead! Go to FSNatureLIVE.org to go caving, visit an American rainforest, or meet bats up close. #BatWeek is coming up soon too, October 24-31. Learn more at their website.

How will you spend National Public Lands Day this year? Let us know by tagging us on social media with a picture of you and Buddy enjoying the outdoors: #BuddyBison #WheresBuddyBisonBeen.

 

 

Buddy Bison Student Ambassador Bryan Shares “Tips for Road Trips”

Buddy Bison Student Ambassador Bryan created a handy list of “Tips for Road Trips” to help you plan your next park adventure. Junior Ranger Bryan has traveled all around the East Coast, Midwest, and even in Canada to explore the outdoors and wants to help you make your next road trip with kids successful!

 

How One Couple’s Love of Parks Will Live On

Bison Legacy Society founding members Rosemary and John Tiernan have spent a lifetime outdoors, teaching their children and grandchildren about the importance of connecting to the natural world. As donors to National Park Trust, they see their legacy and love for parks continuing on in a permanent way that will benefit the entire country.

Rosemary and John Tiernan grew up in New Jersey, visiting parks along the east coast and establishing their relationship with the outdoors at a young age. Rosemary escaped city-life by visiting her grandparents’ farm in Saddle River, NJ, where she could unwind in rolling meadows and swim in a stream that ran through the farm. John connected to nature as a Boy Scout, camping throughout the year from a young age.

“Once you develop that love of nature, and a love of the land, then you feel a stewardship, a responsibility,” noted Rosemary. “It is so important for children to have that opportunity to connect to the outdoors.”

Knowing this importance, the Tiernan’s actively worked to ensure their children and grandchildren had the same opportunities to connect with the natural world. They took regular family vacations to local and national parks. With family now spread across the country, they use parks like Muir Woods National Monument to reconnect with one another.

Now with more free time, Rosemary and John have made a point of visiting the larger national parks that are on their bucket list. Their most recent trip stretched 2,000+ miles with stops in Zion, Bryce Canyon, Grand Canyon, Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, and Mount Rushmore. “You can see it on a TV screen, or read about it in a book, but it’s nothing like being there and experiencing the magnitude of these places,” said John.

Understanding the need for a connection to nature, they wanted to provide that same refuge to others, a space to breathe fresh air and understand the beauty and importance of nature to their daily lives.

In 2017, the Tiernan’s joined our Bison Legacy Society as founding members, a group of extraordinary people who provide future support for National Park Trust through bequests, financial accounts, retirement plans, life insurance policies, and charitable trusts. They view their support of NPT through the Bison Legacy Society as a “no-brainer;” it is a way for them to continue to preserve these places and teach children the importance of protecting these treasured spaces for the future. It is their legacy.

“Many hands make light work. If we all do a little bit we can protect these places and raise a new generation of park stewards to carry on this legacy,” said Rosemary.

The Tiernans chose to support the Bison Legacy Society because they’ve learned that, “NPT is very efficient; I don’t think there is a penny ever wasted, and so you feel as though your dollars are actually doing good, that they will be well-used,” stated Rosemary.

National Park Trust is proud to report that in fiscal year 2017, 89% of our resources were invested in our park preservation and youth education programs and we have been given the Platinum Seal of Transparency from GuideStar and an “A” rating from Charity Watch. We are good stewards of our parks and your gifts!

We invite you to join Rosemary and John in protecting our national parks in perpetuity. If you are interested in becoming a Bison Legacy Society member or have questions, please contact Rebecca Hansell, NPT’s program and office administrator at rebecca@parktrust.org or download this form here. Thank you!

Empowering Young Park Stewards at Cabrillo National Monument

This year for Kids to Parks Day the National Park Trust invited Buddy Bison and me to an interview with Whitney Southwick at NBC7 San Diego. We were there to talk about Kids to Parks Day at Cabrillo National Monument (San Diego, CA).

A few days before the interview, I was not sure what Cabrillo National Monument had planned for Kids to Parks Day, so I contacted my friend, Ranger Alex. I met Ranger Alex when I was volunteering at Channel Islands National Park—she is a scuba diver, scientist, and she loves working with kids. She said that Cabrillo National Monument didn’t have much planned for Kids to

Student Ambassador Tigran (center) and family getting ready for Kids to Parks Day with Ranger Alex (far left).

Parks Day, but she would like to help set up some fun activities. I was very pleasantly surprised about how enthusiastic and excited she was to participate in Kids to Parks Day. In just a few days, she had managed to set up a special booth with science games, junior ranger booklets, and other fun activities.

The day after the interview was Kids to Parks Day, and Buddy Bison, my cousins, and I rushed over to Cabrillo National Monument where we met up with Ranger Alex. She showed us around and let us run the science booth for the day. This Kids to Parks Day was one of the busiest I have ever been to. We were able to talk to a lot of people about the park. At the end of the day, we met with Ranger Alex and I found out that she does other very amazing activities at the park.

Ranger Alex has helped set up some special summer camps like the EcoLogik Project.  The EcoLogik program is a hands-on science camp that connects young ladies to nature and technology. This program is offered free of charge to increase access and promote inclusion for girls from underrepresented backgrounds pursuing scientific fields.  A few weeks later, Ranger Alex invited

EcoLogik participates Ophelia and Clara in action.

me to Cabrillo to talk to some of the kids in the Ecologik camp. When I got there, I found that they had set up an entire event to talk about what they did. The great thing about this camp is that the kids don’t just learn about science and nature; they get involved in REAL science that park rangers do everyday! Even better, the camp is free to enter and it tries to reach out to under-served communities. I was very impressed with all of the knowledge that the kids gained over two weeks of the Ecologik camp. They learned everything from animal telemetry to aquatic animal identification. This camp shows what the next generation of park rangers and visitors might look like. Ecologik gives these kids the tools for success.  

Later that same day I interviewed Ranger Alex about the Program.

  1. What is your name? – Alexandria Warneke
  2. What is your job in the NPS? – Science Program Coordinator and Marine Biologist
  3. What park do you work at? – Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego, CA
  4. What is your favorite part of your job? – I enjoy inspiring others to see the park in a new way and connect them to something they never thought about, or a different part of nature, to really get that “WOW” factor of why they would want to come back and preserve and protect their National Park.
  5. Why is it important to get kids outdoors and involved in activities? – I am really impacted by the idea of ‘legacy’- that something is so incredible, powerful and/or beautiful that people cared enough about it that they wanted to protect it so that others could see too. I think getting kids outdoors connects them to this idea, to their legacy. My job is to make sure that they too are inspired enough to care. 
  6. I have heard that you have set up some special summer camps and activities, would you describe a few? – My team and I are constantly coming up with new and fun activities, but most recently we have just hosted our second year of our summer camp – The EcoLogik Project. This is a two week summer camp for young ladies in science and it’s purpose is to connect them to nature through the lens of technology. In collaboration with our partners, we teach these students how to ask ecological questions within the context of the park and solve environmental problems using the innovative and game changing technology accessible at our fingertips. It is through this framework that we are providing them the tools to be the next generation of park stewards. 
  7. Why are these activities important? – So all the activities we do in the EcoLogik Camp are the actual ways we collect data in the park as scientists, so we don’t water it down at all. We don’t change it. We give them the same tools we are using because kids are fully capable of understanding as long as you make it relatable and provide them a reason to care. These girls are learning the same methods we have used to collect data for the last 30 years in the tidepools. They are learning how to track snakes in the Park using telemetry and why that matters and what does the data mean. So often in schools kids learn how to read graphs, and how to put data on a chart, but getting that context of what that data really means ecologically, what does it mean for the earth, what does it mean for the National Parks is what makes this camp a little bit different.
  8. What materials did you create to for the programs? – We focus on creating fully science integrated materials. We believe that students of all ages are more than capable to understand how we collect data and make inferences into what that data means. We strive to create materials that make science relatable. 
  9. How long have you been doing these activities for? I have been with the Park Service for four years. Before that I was a research scientist with San Diego State University and science communication and education consultant. 
  10. What are the benefits of these programs? National Parks are all about creating connections, people want to feel connected to the resources, to the stories, to the science. Through our program we strive to connect to people where they are- whether that be in the park or in the community. 
  11. Do you think other parks should have similar activities in their local area? – I am constantly inspired by the other units in the National Park Service. I have never met more passionate, hardworking people. I think each park finds it’s own way to connect with their community best. 
  12. What advice would you give to another ranger if they want to set up similar activities? Keep Calm and Adapt On. You must often champion your own projects and sometimes this can be intimidating and there can be many hurdles, but keep your head up, be adaptable, and push forward. You will succeed.

Buddy Bison’s Buzz August Update

The Kids to Parks Day School Contest Is Open!

 

I’m excited to announce that applications are open for the Kids to Parks Day National School Contest! Title I schools can enter and win up to $1,000 to fund a dream park experience. I want to inspire kids and schools to explore the outdoors with me and use nature as their classroom.

The deadline for entries is Thursday, February 14, 2019. Winners will be announced on NPT’s website Thursday, March 7, 2019.

Click here  to learn more about the contest, download the entry form, and watch our school video from last year!

Questions? Contact Katie Zimmerman, (katie@parktrust.org) or call 301-279-7275. If you would like to help sponsor this program, contact Maryann Kearns (maryann@parktrst.org).

KTP Contest Winners Learn New Ways to Explore Outdoors

Last month, I shared some of the awesome projects completed by our Kids to Parks Day School Contest winners from 2018. This month, I wanted to show you a few schools that planned some fun outdoor recreation activities! Check out their adventures from across the country!

Greenwood Elementary (VA) 5th graders aboard the Spirit of the James. Photo courtesy of Greenwood ES.

 

Have you ever gone fishing? The 5th grade class of Greenwood Elementary (VA) participated in the Trouts in the Classroom project, which means they actually got to raise their own fish! They partnered with the James River Association, who took the students out on the river aboard their pontoon boat the Spirit of the James. On the water, they learned firsthand about the trout’s ecosystem. The students took this new knowledge back to their classroom and researched ways to improve their own local trout habitat. Eventually, their trout will be released back into the river. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find their fish one day!

 

 

 

 

 


 

Highland Springs High School (VA) students canoe on the James River. Photo courtesy of Eric Byers.

 

There’s more than one way to enjoy the James River! Highland Springs high schoolers (VA) hopped into canoes to explore their local watershed. Many of these students had never been on any kind of boat before, so it was a brand new (sometimes scary!) experience. By the end of the trip though, they all wanted to do it again! Besides learning to paddle, they also analyzed the water quality of the river. They discovered that even though it looked “bad” to them, it was actually very healthy. Have you ever gone canoeing? Try researching a rental company near you and give it a go!

 

 

 

 

 


 

Horizons Alternative high schoolers (MI) mountain bike at Copper Harbor Township Park. Photo courtesy of Luke Theisen.

A lot of kids know how to ride a bike, but do you know how to mountain bike? With the help of the KTP School Contest, the students of Horizons Alternative High School (MI) hit the trails! A guide lead them through the forests of Copper Harbor Township Park, taking them on paths with jumps and banked turns. Talk about some intense outdoor recreation! The high schoolers didn’t just ride bikes, though. They also gave back by removing spotted knapweed, an invasive species. Thanks to their spirit of stewardship, bikers and hikers will be able to enjoy these trails for years to come.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Girl Scout troop 390 at Chinook Elementary (AK) went camping at Denali National Park. Photo courtesy of Mary Henry.

 

If you’re a Girl Scout of America, you know that Girl Scouts work to “promote respect and love the great outdoors far and wide.” Well, Girl Scout Troop 390 did just that! They went on a 4-night camping trip in Denali National Park (AK). They went hiking, birding, and discovered how to build a fire and use a survival knife safely. Lots of different species of wildlife call Denali home, and the Girl Scouts saw a bunch! Part of the Leave No Trace principles (something else the scouts learned) is to respect wildlife. The girls did their part by observing the caribou, bears, wolverines, moose, snowshoe hares, and foxes from a distance. I hope you have an amazing experience when you go camping too!

 

 

 

 

How the Outdoors Transforms the Lives of Students

Ms. Salgado’s 4th grade class at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center

Heimy Salgado from West Education Campus in Washington, DC is one of my favorite teachers. She also serves on the board of NPT! Her students are in the Buddy Bison School Program and boy have they become park stars! 60% of her students spend more time outdoors with their families. At the start of the year her male students preferred playing video games. Now 90% of them would rather play in nature! I interviewed her for Buzz to find out how she does it. I think you will find what she shares inspirational!

Buddy: How do you work outdoor education into your curriculum beyond field trips?

Ms. Salgado: When I first started the program, I worked to provide the students and their families with information on activities they could do at nearby parks. To make this a learning experience for the students, I taught them how to read local maps so they could find other parks near their homes. Students then had to present research on a park near them with PowerPoint presentations, board displays, and flyers, which they handed out to parents and members of the community. Now, the students and their families have become energized and excited about finding and visiting their local parks and leading a more active life.

Before each field trip I connect the classroom to the outdoors so the students feel empowered, prepared, and excited to see what we have studied indoors and discover for themselves what it looks like outdoors. When preparing for a canoeing trip, we studied different methods of water conservation. In the student’s eyes, it is more than a field trip, they become explorers seeking out what we’ve talked about in class.

Buddy: How did the outdoors affect your students?

Ms. Salgado: I had one student with severe behavior problems at the beginning of the school year, he couldn’t focus and sometimes became aggressive when he was uncomfortable or felt challenged. I tried to teach him in a lot of ways but nothing was working. When we started thinking about ways to learn outdoors something clicked for him and he became really engaged.

When we went canoeing he received a compliment from the instructor leading his canoe and it made his day, it made his week, it made his month! From there on, he began to feel more confident and became a leader in the outdoors. He needed that adventure and activity as an outlet for his energy but it also became his connection to the information I was teaching. I was able to model my planning for him in a way that would allow him to do projects outdoors. Every STEM project he did was outdoors. He explored the different animals that are in DC and did a project on that. It completely changed how the class saw him, how I saw him, and how he saw himself.

Outside of the classroom he has also gone on to be a much more active kid. When I first met him his only hobby was video games, now he asks other students “why would you play video games when you can go outside?”

Buddy: How do you incorporate the outdoors in your lesson plans?

Ms. Salgado: I adapted one of the Buddy Bison School Program lessons that focus on the different types of parks there are in our country to instead look only at the parks in our area. By doing this, I didn’t have to do as much planning and the students had easier access to what we were studying.

To start the lesson we looked at maps, learned how to find parks that were near us, and then made presentations on the parks the students were most interested in. This project provided students with multiple ways of learning the same information.

This project in particular really helped to transform one of my students who had been very quiet, she fell in love with the stories behind the parks and it sparked an interest in her to learn all she could about each park. She became so passionate about the project that other students talk about how she will be a park ranger when she grows up.

Buddy: Can you tell our readers how you use me, Buddy Bison, in your classroom?

Ms. Salgado: In the beginning, the students would take turns taking you out to national parks. They were very excited to hear from each other where Buddy Bison had been over each weekend. Now each student has their own Buddy Bison, they bring him to school attached to their backpacks. They talk about the next trip that they’re gonna take and that they’re going to take their Buddy out.

Buddy: How has your classroom changed since starting the program?

Ms. Salgado: It’s made the actual content I teach more engaging because students know that they will be able to go out and do something with what we have learned in the classroom.

For example, when the students went hiking, they came back and talked about how they get thirsty, and that when you exercise you need to hydrate. Other students focused on the animals that we might have in Washington, DC. These are things that I didn’t have to tell them. They found it on their own and because of that they have a stronger connection to the information than if they had just learned it from a book. The students have realized they’re active learners and shouldn’t expect teachers to tell them everything. They feel empowered to go out and learn on their own. They’ve learned that the “park” in their own backyard has something to teach them.

The parents have also changed considerably, and with having an Every Kid in a Park Pass they are now planning family vacations around visiting parks, something that none of them considered at the start of the school year.

Buddy: How many families are planning park trips?

Ms. Salgado: I would say that 60% of the parents are thinking about ways to get their kids to a national park. Before this program, many of the families relied heavily on video games and TV to entertain their children during the weekend and in summer. Now they’re talking about how important is that their kids go out to play and learn. It’s definitely made a huge impact within the community.

 

Want to learn more about incorporating parks into your classroom? Check out the school resources on our website, or contact our Director of Youth Programs Billy Schrack with your questions: william@parktrust.org, 301-279-7275.

 

Ambassador Audrey Explores Out West

Audrey with Ranger John Slevin a Mesa Verde National Park

“Hello Buddy Bison Friends,

It’s Audrey and right now I am on summer break from school, which means vacation time!  My family is taking a special trip to several new parks. I took my first plane trip to the west coast, which was exciting by itself, but the parks are the feature of this trip.

So far we have been to eleven NPS sites. I started by visiting Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NV, Grand Canyon National Park, AZ, and the “Flagstaff” parks – Walnut Canyon National Monument, Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, Wupatki National Monument, Glen Canyon National Monument (and Horseshoe Bend), Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park. I also visited Navajo National Monument, Mesa Verde National Park, and Hovenweep National Monument.

During our visit to Navajo National Monument I was able to meet up with the latest Buddy Bison Student Ambassador Bryan. It was nice to meet Bryan and his amazing family.

My favorite part so far has been visiting Horseshoe Bend. We actually went twice. The first time it was really hot and we did not pack enough water, so we turned back rather quickly. I’ve learned to bring lots of water and wear appropriate shoes when visiting the parks out west. After we were better equipped, we went back later in the day and there was a breeze – it was still hot, but overall it was a little cooler.

At every park we have visited so far I have seen kids working on their Junior Ranger Booklets and I have been working on mine too. These booklets are great tools to learn more about the park you are visiting. Do not be afraid of getting a question wrong – the Rangers are great at helping and explaining harder questions you may not know or understand.

Another big thing that we have been able to take advantage of is my fourth grade Every Kid In A Park Pass.  This is really the first time I have been able to use the pass – it has been very beneficial to me and my family to allow us to get into parks at no charge.  I am a short time away from starting my fifth grade year, and I wanted to remind those of you who are rising fourth graders to be sure and sign up for the Every Kid In A Park Pass and get out and find a Park near you!

We have learned a lot about geology and Native American Cultures on this trip and it has been amazing! I also gave away a Buddy Bison plush to a little girl during our trip.  That was fun!

Bye for now and see you in the parks my Buddy Bison Friends!

— Audrey”

Student Ambassador Audrey Explores our Western Parks

Hello Buddy Bison Friends,

It’s Audrey and right now I am on summer break from school, which means vacation time!  My family is taking a special trip to several new parks. I took my first plane trip to the west coast, which was exciting by itself, but the parks are the feature of this trip.

So far we have been to eleven NPS sites. I started by visiting Lake Mead National Recreation Area, NV, Grand Canyon National Park, AZ, and the “Flagstaff” parks – Walnut Canyon National Monument, Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, Wupatki National Monument, Glen Canyon National Monument (and Horseshoe Bend), Arches National Park and Canyonlands National

Park. I also visited Navajo National Monument, Mesa Verde National Park, and Hovenweep National Monument. 

During our visit to Navajo National Monument I was able to meet up with the latest Buddy Bison Student Ambassador Bryan. It was nice to meet Bryan and his amazing family. (Pictured Above)

My favorite part so far has been visiting Horseshoe Bend (AZ). We actually went twice. The first time it was really hot and we did not pack enough water, so we turned back rather quickly. I’ve learned to bring lots of water and wear appropriate shoes when visiting the parks out west. After we were better equipped, we went back later in the day and there was a breeze – it was still hot, but overall it was a little cooler.

Ambassador Audrey at Horseshoe Bend

At every park we have visited so far I have seen kids working on their Junior Ranger Booklets and I have been working on mine too. These booklets are great tools to learn more about the park you are visiting. Do not be afraid of getting a question wrong – the Rangers are great at helping and explaining harder questions you may not know or understand. 

Another big thing that we have been able to take advantage of is my fourth grade Every Kid In A Park Pass.  This is really the first time I have been able to use the pass – it has been very beneficial to me and my family to allow us to get into parks at no charge.  I am a short time away from starting my fifth grade year, and I wanted to remind those of you who are rising fourth graders to be sure and sign up for the Every Kid In A Park Pass and get out and find a Park near you!

Ambassador Audrey taking her Junior Ranger Oath at Mesa Verde National Park.

We have learned a lot about geology and Native American Cultures on this trip and it has been amazing! I also gave away a Buddy Bison plush to a little girl during our trip.  That was fun!

Bye for now and see you in the parks my Buddy Bison Friends!

— Audrey