2019 Bruce F. Vento Public Service Award Event Program

This June, National Park Trust awarded Senator Richard Burr (NC) with the 19th Bruce F. Vento Public Service Award. Senator Burr was recognized for his numerous accomplishments including his leadership in seeking permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund – a vision he shared with the award’s namesake, Congressman Bruce Vento. Take a look at clips from the award ceremony.

Video Tribute to Senator Burr

 

 

Speech by third grade Buddy Bison Student, Amari Sowah (Washington, DC)

 

 

Speech by fourth grade Buddy Bison Student Morgan Marsh (Washington, DC)

 

 

Speech by fifth grade Buddy Bison Student Ambassador Audrey Elliott (Nebo, NC)

 

 

Award Acceptance, with speeches by NPT Board Chair Bill Brownell, Sue Vento, and Senator Richard Burr.

Saving One of the Most Scenic Views on the Appalachian Trail

On June 21, National Park Trust became the owner of 239 acres of land along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail at Hogan Hollow, near Troutville, VA. Acquiring the land accomplishes two things; it protects a section of the trail, which runs through the property, and helps preserve the scenic view from McAfee Knob. The 3,197-foot knob is considered one of the most popular and most photographed places on the Appalachian Trail, and Hogan Hollow appears in most photographed landscapes taken from there. NPT will donate this land to the National Park Service, protecting it in perpetuity is as part of the park. 

NPT Executive Director Grace Lee said, “We were excited to have been asked by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy to join the team with them and The Conservation Fund to preserve this land for future generations.”

The ATC was awarded a grant from the Virginia Outdoor Foundation to make the purchase; the money was part of a legal settlement between Virginia and a company wishing to build a pipeline nearby to make up for the environmental cost of construction.

Have an eco-friendly Independence Day

Have an eco-friendly Independence Day

Check-out our guide to greening your July Fourth festivities

The Fourth marks the perfect time for barbecues, outdoor fun, and fireworks. Unfortunately, Independence Day traditions can also be destructive to our environment. But that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy all that summer’s biggest celebration has to offer. With a few changes, your July 4th can be festive and eco-friendly!

Gather Outside

Your national parks, local parks, and backyard offer the perfect lighting, temperature, and a green setting for your celebration. The larger a group you gather outside, the less energy you use at individual indoor parties.

  • Make sure to practice Leave No Trace principles like avoiding closed areas that protect wildlife and marine habitat. Pack out and appropriately dispose of all garbage.
  • Consider hosting your barbecue at midday when the light is bright and fills your guests with energy. Or fight the heat by hosting your get together during cooler evening weather. 

BBQ Basics

There are many ways to make this Fourth of July staple easy on our planet.

  • Serve locally grown, pesticide-free fruits and veggies, and choose sustainably raised meat for your grill.
  • Charcoal, while delicious, creates air pollution and poses serious health risks. Consider using propane or electric grills – many retailers will let your trade in your empty propane tank for a discount on your next purchase.
  • Respect any burn bans. If no ban is in place, fires must be at least 100 feet from vegetation and other critical resources.
  • Plastic water bottles may be an easy option, but they create waste and may be bad for your health. Store water and other drinks for guests in large containers so they can refill their reusable cups or bottles. 
  • Use recyclable or reusable tableware to prevent items from going into the landfill. Reuse your patriotic decorations next year, or skip buying decor, and use local flowers for your table.

Skip the Fireworks and Light it Up

Fireworks are an Independence Day tradition along with the fires and fear that they cause for pets and humans. You don’t need the bang of fireworks to have a blast this Fourth.

  • Many cities now host laser shows, and those lights can be used time and time again whereas fireworks can only be used once. 
  • Glow-in-the-dark LED toys can be just as beautiful as fireworks and they keep you away from all the chemicals caused by an explosion. 
  • If you have a fire pit and it is safe, a nice campfire can provide even better ambiance than fireworks
  • If fireworks are a must, gather at your local fireworks display. It’s a great way to see a much larger show and prevents you from harming the environment with your own personal display. 

We hope you celebrate this July Fourth thoughtfully and sustainably!

Atlantic City School Teacher Receives National Award for Her Environmental Leadership

National Park Trust Logo

 

 

 

MEDIA STATEMENT
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: William Schrack, William@parktrust.org, 301-279-7275 x20

From L to R: Lesette Nikki Jackson, Caesars HERO Community Relations; Buddy Bison, NPT Mascot; Yolanda Smith; and Grace Lee, NPT Executive Director.

Washington, DC (June 18, 2019) – National Park Trust (NPT) is pleased to announce that Yolanda Smith, a fifth-grade teacher from Richmond Avenue School in Atlantic City, NJ, is the recipient of National Park Trust’s 2019 National Educator Award for Outstanding Environmental Stewardship.

Thanks to sponsorship from the Caesars Foundation as well as local property support, Richmond Avenue has been able to participate in NPT’s national Buddy Bison School Program since 2013. Yolanda has served as the lead teacher for the multi-year partnership. Over the course of her involvement in the program, Yolanda has developed and implemented an in-depth advanced science program and created a customized curriculum that uses parks as outdoor classrooms. Yolanda also developed her own learning objectives for each park field trip to ensure that all of her students walked away with knowledge gained from their hands-on experiences.

In 2014, Yolanda’s classroom participated in the first ever Buddy Bison Carbon Reduction Contest which aims to teach elementary school children how to identify, measure, and reduce their impact on the environment. Each year, students from different schools take nine different action items included in NPT’s contest toolkit to reduce their carbon footprint. Yolanda’s class won the 2017 Carbon Reduction Contest; they prevented 956 lbs of carbon dioxide from being emitted into the air.

Yolanda Smith accepting her award from Grace Lee, Executive Director of National Park Trust.

Furthermore, Yolanda’s classroom initiatives not only taught her students the tangible impact of their carbon footprint but also led the way to energy-saving improvements school-wide, reducing their energy bill by $100,000. This remarkable development was noticed by the school district, resulting in changes that led to an $800,000 energy cost savings for their entire school district.

Yolanda Smith showing her award to one of her students.

Through the Buddy Bison program and its Carbon Reduction Contest, all of her students have learned how to reduce their carbon footprint and educate others. “We may be molding the next Neil deGrasse Tyson or Albert Einstein,” noted Yolanda as she talked about the impact she has seen on her students. “The possibilities are endless with the knowledge and exposure they have gained. We have taken part in training the next generation of young minds, ready to excel as environmental stewards leading us into the next millennium.”

“We were delighted to honor and recognize Yolanda Smith from Richmond Avenue School with our 2019 National Educator Award. Over the years she has gone above and beyond to connect her Buddy Bison students with the numerous benefits of the great outdoors. These students will be the future stewards of our parks,” stated NPT Executive Director Grace Lee.

“Participating in this program is truly a highlight for our HERO volunteers,” said Lesette Nikki Jackson. “The opportunity to create a new memorable experience for children is its own reward. Yolanda has made environmental education a priority for the students and staff of Richmond Avenue School, creating a positive ripple effect in the community. She has literally opened doors for city kids to go outside and experience all that nature has to offer. Watching the transformation when the students realize playing is an engaging experience and not just an app on a screen is an inspiration. We are excited to see what the future holds for these students and this great program.

 

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust (NPT) is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. NPT is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of protecting national parks through land acquisition and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by getting kids to parks. Since 1983, NPT has completed 70 land projects in 31 states, 1 US Territory, and Washington, DC. This school year, NPT will provide an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools.

Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

 

ABOUT CAESARS FOUNDATION

Caesars Foundation is a private foundation funded by a portion of operating income from resorts owned or operated by Caesars Entertainment. The Foundation is the entity through which Caesars Entertainment funds programs and projects of $10,000 or more, as well as not for-profit giving requirements imposed by certain operating jurisdictions. The Foundation’s objective is to strengthen organizations and programs in the communities where our employees and their families live and work.

To learn more, visit www.caesarsfoundation.com.

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NPT News June Update

Did you know everyone lives in a shed? A watershed, that is! Nearly 800 Buddy Bison students recently learned that a watershed is an area of land where all the water – creeks, streams, even runoff from roads – flows into one large body of water. A big Buddy Bison round of applause to the Bunting Family, Tom and Kathy Hewitt, the Washington Duke Inn, and Georgia-Pacific Foundation for making these trips possible.

 

Beacon Heights Elementary (MD) 5th graders visited the Washington Youth Garden (DC) at the U.S. National Arboretum. They used their five senses to explore both the garden and the “Fern Valley” exhibit where they experienced what their neighborhood would be like if left untouched by humans. Plus, volunteers from Pepco joined us to help out including Pepco Region President, Donna Cooper.

 

 

Frederick Elementary (MD) and Neval Thomas Elementary (DC) 3rd graders spent their morning at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center discovering the amazing adaptations of oysters and the essential role these filter feeders play in the health of the Bay. The students from Frederick then learned how to find geocaches on a hike around the park, and Neval Thomas used dip nets to explore the bay for creatures!

 

 

Powe Elementary 2nd graders and The Emily K Center (NC) journeyed to Falls Lake State Recreation Area where they met up with Frog Hollow Outfitters, Sarah P. Duke Gardens, and state park rangers for a day of canoeing, hiking, and fishing! They learned several different ways to enjoy the lake while preserving it for other people to enjoy.

 

 

M. Agnes Jones Elementary (GA) explored the unique ecosystems of Davidson-Arabia Mountain Nature Preserve. Using dip-nets, they caught aquatic animals in one of the park’s vernal pools, determining that the water was pretty healthy. Plus, they hiked to the top of the mountain!

 

 

Four schools that are part of the 100% Project in Baltimore went to Oregon Ridge Nature Center (MD) and investigated the different bodies of water in the park. They performed “stream studies” on each one to figure out how healthy they were. All the kids returned home with a better idea of how their own actions affect their water. HERO volunteers from Caesar’s Foundation joined us to help out, not just in Baltimore, but with schools across the country this spring, from SAGE Center in Missouri and Metropolis Elementary in Illinois, to Pennsylvania Avenue Elementary in New Jersey.

 

 

Nothing says summer like a campfire and s’mores! Because of a generous gift from the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, 250 Buddy Bison students from the Washington, DC area had their first camping experience.

Howard University Middle, Woodbridge Public Charter, and Stuart-Hobson Middle all traveled to Prince William Forest Park (VA) where staff from NatureBridge led them in discovering the park. These kids didn’t just hike, they also practiced their scientific inquiry skills and collected data points and samples for the National Park Service.

 

 

Washington School for Girls, West Education Campus, and Stuart-Hobson Middle trekked to Hemlock Overlook Regional Park in Northern Virginia. There, they practiced their team-building skills on ropes courses both low and high, as well as explored the local ecology.

 

 

E.W. Stokes Public Charter visited Calvert Cliffs State Park in southern Maryland. There, they sent up camp, hunted for fossils on the beach, and learned about the 40 million-year-old creatures they could find.

 

 

 

 

Buddy Bison Student Ambassador Tigran shares how he tested his skills on a 100-mile journey through Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. Find out what he learned on his most challenging outdoor experience ever and how he is starting a new chapter with NPT—as an Ambassador Alumni! Read about his journey here.