Posts Tagged ‘National Park Foundation’

Historic Landmark and Shoreline Protected in Washington State at Ebey’s Landing

National Park Trust, Historic Whidbey, National Park Foundation, National Park Service, and numerous local partners worked collectively this month to preserve one of Washington state’s oldest homes and a critical parcel of shoreline within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve on Whidbey Island. Thanks to this partnership, the 150 year old Haller House will be preserved, maintaining the historical landscape of downtown Coupeville, WA, as well as the shoreline of the property which connects the house to Penn’s Cove.

Interior view of Haller House, portraits of Henrietta and Granville Haller rest on the fireplace mantle, photo courtesy of Historic Whidbey

The Haller House is an exceptional representation of the pioneering life that Americans established in 1860’s Coupeville, WA. The house was initially built in 1859 before Colonel Granville Haller, a Civil War veteran, arrived on Whidbey Island in 1866 and purchased the property. Haller added the larger two-story portion of the home. The property once included a large warehouse and store along the waterfront of Penn’s Cove which supported the town with dry goods through Haller Mercantile.

“Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve was established forty years ago based on the understanding that historic preservation would require close cooperation among all levels of government and between the public and private sector.  In celebration of the Reserve’s 40th anniversary, we sincerely appreciate the assistance provided by the National Park Trust in helping to preserve this important heritage asset. Their assistance is a shining example of the Reserve idea in action” noted Roy Zipp, Superintendent, NPS Operations

Now that the home has an easement to protect the historic nature of the property, Historic Whidbey will begin work to revitalize the home to its former glory while keeping the exterior of the house historically accurate. Thanks to an unusual history of ownership, the house has never been modernized and remains mostly historically intact to the late nineteenth century. The house will eventually become a heritage center to tell the history of Washington’s Territorial period.

Though the acreage of this lot is small in comparison to the 19,000+ acres that make up Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, the history of this downtown home and its access to Penn’s Cove made it a critically important parcel for the National Park Service. In 2013, The Washington Trust for Historic Preservation listed the Haller House as one of the state’s ‘Most Endangered Properties.’

“When contacted by the National Park Service about the shortfall of funds needed to complete this important project, we were pleased to be able to respond quickly to close the gap in a timely fashion” said Phil Selleck, National Park Trust’s Park Projects  Director. “We saw it as a unique opportunity to keep the historical landscape of pioneer-age Washington intact.”

National Park Trust’s donation to complete the project was provided by NPT board member Kevin Seth, who shared, “as a new member of the board, I was delighted to help National Park Trust in its mission to preserve and protect our critical national parks, especially when there was a sense of urgency to complete this historic project.”

 

 

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust (NPT) is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. NPT is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of protecting national parks through land acquisition, and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by getting kids to parks. Since 1983, NPT has completed 70 land projects in 31 states, 1 US Territory, and Washington, DC. This school year NPT will provide an estimated 27,000 kids with park trips  through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison School Program and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools.

Find out more at www.parktrust.org

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35 Acres Protected in Zion National Park

National Park Trust (NPT) is pleased to announce that 35 acres of once private land has been permanently protected from development and returned to Zion National Park. NPT worked with The Trust for Public Land and the National Park Foundation to purchase the 35 acre in-holding—a privately owned piece of land completely surrounded by the park—and donate the land to the National Park Service.

The land is near Firepit Knoll, on the Kolob Terrace in the north west area of the park and is an important section of the park for hikers traveling the popular Hop Valley Trail. In protecting this area from development, visitors can continue to enjoy the natural landscape unique to Zion.

View of Kolob Terrace area, Zion National Park, photo courtesy of the National Park Service

NPT assisted our partners with this project by providing the final funds required for closing costs and due-diligence work on the property before it could be processed for donation to the National Park Service.

“National Park Trust is honored to have worked with The Trust for Public Land and National Park Foundation to permanently preserve this land for generations to come,” said Phil Selleck, Park Projects Director at National Park Trust. “We believe it is critical that we complete our national parks to protect them from any development within park boundaries that would diminish their status as a national treasure as well as our legacy for those future generations; this was an important step in protecting Zion National Park.”  

“Visiting a national park like Zion is a once in a lifetime experience for many people,” said Jim Petterson Southwest and Colorado Director for The Trust for Public Land.  “That experience should be about majesty and wonder and dramatic and unspoiled landscapes. Working with our partners to protect Firepit Knoll ensures future generations will have the opportunity to experience grand views of the Zion Wilderness unmarred by incompatible development.”

“Partnership is vital to protecting America’s national treasures,” said Will Shafroth, president of the National Park Foundation. “The National Park Foundation’s collaboration with The Trust for Public Land, National Park Trust, and donors preserves an important piece of our shared inheritance so that all people can experience it.”

This is the second project National Park Trust has completed within the same area in Zion National Park. In 2012, NPT worked with National Parks Conservation Association and The Trust for Public Land to protect a 30 acre parcel at the base of Tabernacle Dome, just four miles from the current project.

 

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust (NPT) is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. NPT is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of protecting national parks through land acquisition, and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by getting kids to parks. Since 1983, NPT has completed 66 land projects in 30 states, 1 US Territory, and Washington, DC. This school year NPT will provide an estimated 27,000 kids with park trips  through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison School Program and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools.

Find out more at www.parktrust.org

 

ABOUT THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND

The Trust for Public Land creates parks and protects land for people, ensuring healthy, livable communities for generations to come. Millions of people live within a 10-minute walk of a Trust for Public Land park, garden, or natural area, and millions more visit these sites every year.

To support The Trust for Public Land and share why nature matters to you, visit www.tpl.org  

 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION

Celebrating 50 years, the National Park Foundation is the official charity of America’s national parks and nonprofit partner to the National Park Service. Chartered by Congress in 1967, the National Park Foundation raises private funds to help PROTECT more than 84 million acres of national parks through critical conservation and preservation efforts, CONNECT all Americans with their incomparable natural landscapes, vibrant culture and rich history, and ENGAGE the next generation of park stewards. In 2016, commemorating the National Park Service’s 100th anniversary, the Foundation launched The Centennial Campaign for America’s National Parks, a comprehensive fundraising campaign to strengthen and enhance the future of these national treasures for the next hundred years.

Find out more and become a part of the national park community at www.nationalparks.org

The Appalachian Trail Needs Your Help

Update (January 23, 2017): Success! NPT and The Trust for Public Land successfully worked to acquire this land in December 2017 for future donation to the National Park Service. Thank you for your interest and support.

If you’ve seen the pristine waters and lush terrain at Maine’s Bald Mountain Pond, you’d understand why National Park Trust (NPT) has been working with The Trust for Public Land (TPL) on the acquisition of an adjacent 1,527-acre parcel of old-growth woodland to benefit the National Park Service’s Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT).

The remoteness and scenic views make the property an iconic destination for backcountry adventures that combine paddling and hiking on the AT into a single day’s outing. Preserving this land from development also protects the nearby Bald Mountain Pond which is one of the few bodies of water that holds landlocked arctic char in the lower 48 states. The federally-listed threatened Canada Lynx also roams nearby, along with moose, fisher and black bears. It is one of the largest 150-year-old forest blocks in central Maine.

Thanks to an extraordinary bequest from John Kauffmann to NPT and the National Park Foundation and wind mitigation funds received by TPL, along with a generous gift from The Conservation Alliance, significant progress toward the $2.4 million cost of the project has been made. However, an additional $700,000 must be raised by December 2017 when the option to buy expires. If not protected, the owner may begin logging or developing the property, which could affect the plant and wildlife communities, the viewshed from the AT, and public access.

This is a time when NPT and the AT really needs your help. We hope that you will join us to protect this extraordinary piece of property by contacting Phil Selleck, park projects director, at phil@parktrust.org or call (301) 279-7275 ext 14.