Valles Caldera’s hot springs are up for sale – You can save them!

America’s beloved national park sites are protected for all of us to enjoy because of people like you. We know you believe our treasured landscapes should be defended against destructive development.

The last privately owned acres inside Valles Caldera National Preserve have been put up for sale to the highest bidder – This is your chance to permanently protect this land and complete the park!

Make A Gift

Valles Caldera is one of only five places in America featuring geothermal wonders, including sulfuric acid fumaroles, hot springs, natural gas seeps, and mudpots. And all of those features are on the last piece of private land located inside the park’s boundaries.

Situated in the caldera of a supervolcano, the Preserve protects:

  • 40 miles of pristine trout streams
  • 66,118 acres of conifer forests
  • 17 endangered plant and animal species, and
  • 25,000 acres of grassland grazed by New Mexico’s largest herd of elk.

Use of this enchanting landscape dates back to prehistoric times – Obsidian spear points dating to 11,000 years ago have been discovered in the area.

Your support will not only preserve the only geothermal features in the caldera, but also ensure that visitors will finally have a chance to explore them.

Protection of this parcel would also mean that the last unmanaged portion of the Sulfur Creek headwaters would be protected by the Park Service, ensuring oversight of water quality flowing downstream.

We need 100 park lovers to make a gift of $350, or any amount to complete VallesCaldera National Preserve – Will you be one of the 100?

With your gift, we can negotiate the transfer of this spectacular piece of Valles Calderato the National Park System right away.

The threat of a for-profit geothermal resort being built on the parcel is real, but I know with your help, we can save this place and ensure that park visitors can be can delighted and inspired by all that it has to offer.

Can we count on you to make a gift today?

Donate Today

Photo courtesy of Mathew Dillon.