National Park Trust Blog

HYDRO FLASK RECEIVES AMERICAN PARK EXPERIENCE AWARD

                                                                                                                                      

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 13, 2020

NATIONAL PARK TRUST TO HONOR HYDRO FLASK WITH AMERICAN PARK EXPERIENCE AWARD

Washington, D.C. (October 13, 2020) – The Board of Trustees of National Park Trust are pleased to announce that they will honor Bend, Oregon-based outdoor brand Hydro Flask with the distinguished 2020 American Park Experience Award, which honors an individual or group that has made extraordinary contributions to enhance the awareness and appreciation of our nation’s parks and public lands and waters. For the first time in the history of the award, National Park Trust will bestow this honor, not on a person, but on an organization by recognizing Hydro Flask’s innovative and impactful Parks For All giving program.

The award was presented during a virtual ceremony hosted on National Park Trust’s YouTube Live channel on Wednesday, October 21 at 6 p.m. ET/ 3 p.m. PT.

Speakers at the 2020 American Park Experience Award celebration included:

  • Grace Lee, Executive Director, National Park Trust
  • Bill Brownell, Board Chair, National Park Trust
  • Larry Witt, President, Helen of Troy Housewares (OXO & Hydro Flask)
  • Indigo Teiwes, Associate Director of Corporate Responsibility, Helen of Troy Housewares (OXO & Hydro Flask)
  • Teresa Ana Martinez, Executive Director, Continental Divide Trail Coalition
  • Eliza Sarasohn, Senior Director of Communications, The Trust for Public Land
  • Jeanne Braha, Executive Director, Rock Creek Conservancy
  • Amanda Boston, Program Coordinator, Glen Canyon Conservancy
  • Chad Pregracke, Founder & President, Living Lands & Waters
  • Hugo Tagholm, CEO, Surfers Against Sewage (UK)
  • Jaysi Ramirez, Buddy Bison Student, Ida B. Wells Middle School, Washington DC
  • Nela Grosova-Reyes, Buddy Bison Student, Bucknell Elementary, Alexandria, VA

“Hydro Flask’s Parks For All program supports non-profit organizations across the United States and globally whose missions align with building, maintaining, restoring, or providing better access to parks. With donations of $1.5 million to 92 non-profits since the program began in 2017, the impact of the company’s commitment is extraordinary and thus deserving of the American Park Experience Award,” said Bill Brownell, board chair of National Park Trust.

Hydro Flask launched its giving program Parks for All in January 2017 to support the development, maintenance, and accessibility of public lands and green spaces in the U.S. and beyond so people everywhere can live healthier, happier, and more fulfilled lives. The program aims to ensure these special places get the attention and protection they deserve through on the ground activities, digital and advocacy initiatives, and social media campaigns. To date, Parks For All has supported 92 non-profits, given over $1,500,000 in cash grants, and donated more than 26,000 bottles.

“Parks For All is our way of sharing the love we have for parks and public green spaces,” said Helen of Troy Housewares President Larry Witt. “For us, parks and public lands represent special places that lead to more joy-filled lives: we believe that if you love a park, they’ll love you back through mental, emotional, and physical health benefits. We’re honored that our contributions have been recognized by National Park Trust and are humbled to join the distinguished ranks of American Park Experience Award winners as the first-ever organization to receive this prestigious award.”

The American Park Experience Award, established in 2009, honors an individual or group that has made extraordinary contributions to enhance the awareness and appreciation of our nation’s parks and public lands and waters. Past recipients include: Sally Jewell, former Secretary of Interior (2016); Dan Biederman (2015); Ken Salazar, former U.S Senator (CO) and former Secretary of Interior (2010); and, Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan (2009)

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

ABOUT HYDRO FLASK

Hydro Flask® is the leader in high-performance insulated products that help people enjoy the things they love to do in the places they love to be. From the number-one-selling water bottle to soft good innovations like our Unbound Series™ Soft Coolers and Down Shift™ Hydration Packs, Hydro Flask’s delightfully simple designs and go-anywhere durability always deliver the perfect temperature when you need it. Founded in 2009 in Bend, Oregon, Hydro Flask inspires active outdoor lives with two simple words: Let’s Go! Its giving platform Parks For All supports the development, maintenance, restoration, and accessibility of public green spaces so people everywhere can live healthier, happier and more fulfilled lives. To learn more about Hydro Flask, Parks for All, and to see our full lineup of award-winning products, visit www.hydroflask.com.

Media Contact: Ivan Levin at 540.818.5818 or ivan@parktrust.org.

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NATIONAL PARK TRUST AND NATIONAL PARK SERVICE ANNOUNCE 2020 CHALLENGE COST SHARE AWARDS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 15, 2020

NATIONAL PARK TRUST AND NATIONAL PARK SERVICE ANNOUNCE 2020 CHALLENGE COST SHARE AWARDS

More than $360,000 awarded to 19 projects that promote access to outdoor recreation, stewardship, and connecting people to the outdoors.

Washington, D.C. (September 15, 2020) – Today, National Park Trust in partnership with the National Park Service (NPS), announced 19 education and outdoor recreation projects that are funded by the NPS Challenge Cost Share Program and matched by community and nonprofit partners. Each project works to connect local communities to their national parks, national trails, and wild and scenic rivers. Projects include engaging people in active healthy outdoor recreation or in education initiatives that increase knowledge about our nation’s natural and cultural heritage.

“National Park Trust is thrilled to partner with the National Park Service and many local partners across the country to connect all people to national parks and engage a new generation of outdoor enthusiasts and stewards,” said Grace Lee, executive director of National Park Trust. “The Challenge Cost Share program is one of the most effective initiatives that leverage public and private funds and invests in local partnerships that deliver results.”

“Working with the National Park Trust has allowed the National Park Service to better preserve our parks while creating park stewards for tomorrow. Local partner organizations across the country are contributing their skills, talents, and resources to conservation and outdoor recreation projects that provide increased public access while protecting our national parks,” said Stephan Nofield, National Program Manager, National Park Service.

A sample of the 2020 projects includes:

  • Installation of educational gardens at Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument;
  • Training urban and rural youth in trail construction at Rocky Mountain National Park;
  • Providing place-based education and workforce development opportunities for local youth at Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument.

At First State Historical Park in Delaware, nearly 100 program participants will explore local waterways by canoe and take part in watershed stewardship, learning valuable Watershed STEM lessons meant to spark interest in watershed ecology and illustrate the importance of local waterways past and present.

In Boston, Massachusetts, high school students are participating in a Green Ambassador program where they will work with NPS staff from Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park to develop knowledge and skills in environmental science, resource stewardship, and park management. At Indiana Dunes National Park in Indiana, military and veteran families will have outdoor adventures while they enjoy the health benefits of spending time in nature. Families in Southern Florida will be introduced to fishing, snorkeling, and paddling experiences in Biscayne and Everglades National Parks.

Partnerships make these projects possible. The National Park Service is providing $386,000 in direct financial support. Community and non-profit organizations that partner with local National Park Service sites have pledged more than $750,000 in direct and in-kind support to individual projects across the country. National Park Trust is administering the program and leveraging additional financial resources to deepen the program’s impact and reach.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support nearly 300 Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 419 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov, on Facebook www.facebook.com/nationalparkservice, Twitter www.twitter.com/natlparkservice, and YouTube www.youtube.com/nationalparkservice.

Media Contact: Ivan Levin at 540.818.5818 or ivan@parktrust.org.

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Great American Outdoors Act is Signed Into Law

On August 4th, the president signed the Great American Outdoors Act marking the greatest conservation achievement in decades! This act will not only provide $900 million annually for the Land and Water Conservation Fund but will also begin to tackle the National Park Service’s maintenance backlog with a $9.5 billion infusion over five years.

Click here to read more.

NATIONAL PARK TRUST HELPS PROTECT POPULAR SCENIC VIEW ON THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL IN VIRGINIA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 4, 2020

NATIONAL PARK TRUST HELPS PROTECT POPULAR SCENIC VIEW ON THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL IN VIRGINIA

Washington, D.C. (August 4, 2020) – On July 23, 2020, the National Park Trust transferred ownership of 239 acres of land in one of the most popular areas of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (A.T.) near Troutville, Virginia to the National Park Service. In the fall of 2018, the Park Trust volunteered to support the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) in the acquisition of the property in Hogan Hollow, Virginia. The landowner wanted to sell before the National Park Service could accept the acreage, so in June 2019, the Park Trust worked with The Conservation Fund to acquire and temporarily hold the property until it could become part of the A.T.

The ATC was awarded a grant from the Virginia Outdoors Foundation to make the purchase and The Conservation Fund managed the transfer of the property from the landowners.

“The Appalachian Trail Conservancy gives its sincere thanks to the National Park Trust for making the preservation of Hogan Hollow a reality,” said Sandra Marra, President and CEO of the ATC. “This acquisition will help preserve the views from McAfee Knob, one of the most beloved locations on the entire Appalachian Trail, and ensures that the area’s natural beauty and ecologically important lands are preserved for the enjoyment and benefit of future generations.”

Wendy Janssen, superintendent of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, said about the acquisition, “This acquisition highlights the power of partnership in preserving and protecting the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. The National Park Service thanks all those involved for their commitment and support to secure the Hogan Hollow property and this critical viewshed for the enjoyment and benefit of all.”

Thousands of hikers each year see Hogan Hollow from McAfee Knob. The 3,197-foot overlook is thought to be one of the most scenic views on the A.T. It’s been said that more pictures are taken there than any other place on the trail. This view could dramatically change if the property was developed or the trees cut, which happened on neighboring land. This project also protects a section of the trail which runs through the property.

National Park Trust’s Executive Director Grace Lee stated, “We are delighted to provide our assistance and expertise to benefit the preservation of our national park sites, and are pleased to be able to assist the Appalachian National Scenic Trail in preserving this land for park visitors to enjoy in perpetuity.”

Hogan Hollow is the Park Trust’s third completed project to acquire land for the A.T. In conjunction with conservation partners, 219 acres near Pawling, NY were added in 2018 and 1,494 acres at Bald Mountain Pond, ME in 2019.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support nearly 300 Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

 

Media Contact: Ivan Levin at 540.818.5818 or ivan@parktrust.org.

ParkPassport Mobile App

Discover and Experience Parks From Around The Country

Download and use our ParkPassport App to discover new outdoor places to explore all year long.

Unique features include:

  • A Park Finder to discover federal, state, and local parks, National Marine Sanctuaries, and Marine National Monuments.
  • A Digital Passport to collect badges for different parks and outdoor activities, including custom badges for the 61 national parks. You can even add badges from parks you have visited on past trips. JUST ADDED: New badges for marine sanctuaries, marine national monuments, and seven new water activities.
  • Photo Sharing to upload and share your park images.
  • NEW: More than 600 virtual resources and experiences have been added, including virtual tours, live webcams, educational videos, and more.
  • Ability to Invite Friends to join and share outdoor experiences.

The app is currently available for download from the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Watch our ParkPassport App tutorial!


Sign up to receive National Park Trust’s monthly e-newsletter to learn more about our work to preserve and protect our national parks across the country.

NATIONAL PARK TRUST LAUNCHES BUDDY BISON CREATIVE LEARNING PROGRAM TO BRING PARKS TO TITLE I SCHOOL STUDENTS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 28, 2020

NATIONAL PARK TRUST LAUNCHES BUDDY BISON CREATIVE LEARNING PROGRAM TO BRING PARKS TO TITLE I SCHOOL STUDENTS

New National Distance Learning Program Made Possible with Generous Support from the Wyss Foundation and the National Park Service

Washington, D.C. (July 28, 2020) With so much still unknown about what education will look like for the 2020/2021 school year, National Park Trust announces the launch of a robust distance-learning initiative based on its renowned Buddy Bison School Program which for more than a decade has provided fully funded park experiences for kids in under-served communities including kids of color. This new education package –THE BUDDY BISON CREATIVE LEARNING PROGRAM — is being launched nationwide in Title I schools this fall.

With generous early lead support of $200,000 from the Wyss Foundation, the Park Trust will bring parks to kids with a program that aligns with classroom curricula, is adaptable to different educational situations (whether the students are in school or remote learning at home), and has hands-on learning components to supplement digital materials. The foundation’s gift will also be matched by National Park Service Centennial Challenge funds.

COVID-19 has created unprecedented challenges that impact students and families especially those in under-served communities. With 80% of Buddy Bison Program students qualifying for free or reduced-price lunch, the federal indicator of low income, these students often do not have the resources at home to support online education or the complementary hands-on activities available to them that can offset hours of sedentary screen time each day. Working closely with teachers who are looking to provide fun, engaging educational activities that support their classroom curricula, the Buddy Bison Creative Learning Program will provide innovative programming that keeps students engaged with our parks and outdoor education while maintaining physical distancing and meeting new school safety policies

The program and materials will emphasize the Buddy Bison Program’s three pillars:

  • Education: using parks as outdoor classrooms through hands-on activities and virtual visits including visits from rangers or special guests.
  • Health and Wellness: encouraging kids to get moving outside safely near their home or at parks for their mental and physical wellbeing.
  • Stewardship: teaching kids about their role as park stewards and caretakers of our environment.

To align with these pillars, the Buddy Bison Creative Learning Program will include 10 units on subject areas including fossils, watersheds, animal adaptations, plants, geomorphology, stars/space, and even park art. Acknowledging the importance of national parks as places where the stories of our country are preserved and retold, a unit on important figures in history will also be featured.

“After the pandemic hit and schools were abruptly closed, we listened to the needs and challenges of the hundreds of teachers that we support across the country. The National Park Trust is committed to supporting our students during this crisis and will continue our work to break down barriers that prevent under-served communities from accessing and engaging with the benefits of the great outdoors,” said Grace Lee, executive director, National Park Trust. “The new Buddy Bison Creative Learning Program will help to bring those fun and memorable park experiences to students no matter where they are learning this school year.”

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support nearly 300 Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

Media Contact: Ivan Levin at 540.818.5818 or ivan@parktrust.org.

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Welcome to Week Four of Camp Buddy Bison

Thank you for joining us and our wooly mascot Buddy Bison over the past month as we explored national parks across the country. Our last camp adventure this summer is to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

This week, Camp Buddy Bison features six fun activities for you to enjoy: yoga with a unique twist, an awe-inspiring virtual tour, Jr. Ranger activities, two animal crafts, and an eco-challenge. Complete one or more activities per day.

Did you miss other weeks of camp? Don’t worry, you can view all of the activities here.

For our final week of Camp Buddy Bison, we are exploring Great Smoky Mountains National Park located in Tennessee and North Carolina. The park is part of the Appalachian Mountains, a mountain chain that stretches from Alabama to Canada. The Smokies feature some of the highest peaks in eastern North America. The 480 million-year-old mountains were once as high as the much younger summits of the Alps and Rocky Mountains.

Did you know that it’s the third most visited national park site in the country and attracted 12.5 million visitors in 2019? One of its draws is the abundance of wildlife, including black bear which has a population of 1,500 – 1,600 as well as being one of the only remaining homes in the United States for lungless salamanders.

Click on the images (and some links) below to learn more about Great Smoky Mountains National Park and get started on this week’s activities!

Bear Catching Yoga

Bear Catching Yoga

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of the largest protected areas in the eastern United States where black bears can live in wild, natural surroundings. Join Cosmic Kids for a “We’re Going On A Bear Hunt” yoga adventure.

Virtual Tour

Virtual Tour

This park is one of the most visited because of its numerous hiking trails, waterfalls, abundant plants and animals, as well as gorgeous overlooks. Check out some of its most popular areas by taking this Google Earth virtual tour.

Slimy Sanctuary

Slimy Sanctuary

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is known as the “Salamander Capital of the World!” There are over 30 different species living there and it is a key location for the study of these environmentally significant animals. Follow along with interns at Smoky Mountains as they learn about salamanders. Then, demonstrate what you’ve learned by drawing your own with this tutorial from SmokiEEEs at Home!

Buddy's Bird Wings

Buddy's Bird Wings

Over 240 bird species, from soaring hawks to singing warblers, fly through the skies above the Great Smoky Mountains. Each bird has a unique wing shape that matches its lifestyle. Learn about bird wing adaptations with Buddy Bison and build your own sets of wings. You can test them out and observe how wing shapes affect flight.

Bear Track Stamps

Bear Track Stamps

The park is home to a very large population of black bear; in fact, this year there are around 1,500 to 1,600 – a record-breaking number for the park! Despite their large number, black bear can still be challenging for researchers to locate among the large, rolling hills of the region. Learn how they track and identify bears, and other types of animals, by creating your own animal print stamps with Buddy Bison.

Eating Right

Eating Right

Historically, people used to eat a lot of foods that were gathered directly from nature. For example, in the Smoky Mountains alone there are eight common berries that can be collected. Today, we can still make good food choices that keep us and the planet strong and healthy. Learn how simple diet changes can lead to a healthier lifestyle that also allows parks and wildlife to thrive!

Welcome to Week Three of Camp Buddy Bison

Thanks for exploring Big Cypress National Preserve with us last week. Over the next two weeks, we will discover two more national park sites with our mascot Buddy Bison: Yellowstone National Park and Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each week, our camp features six fun activities for you to enjoy, including experiments, crafts, virtual tours, Jr. Ranger Booklets, and eco-challenges. Complete one or more activity per day.

Did you miss camp last week? Don’t worry, you can view all of the activities here.

Founded in 1872, Yellowstone is our nation’s first-ever national park. The park is located in three states: Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, and covers 3,472 square miles. That’s bigger than Rhode Island and Delaware combined!

Yellowstone sits on top of an active volcano, which powers the geysers and hot springs the park is famous for including Old Faithful. The park is also home to lots of different animals, including grizzly bears, elk, bison, and wolves!

Did you know that Buddy went on his own Yellowstone adventure? Check out this National Geographic Kids book by author Ilona E. Holland.

Click on the images to learn more about Yellowstone and get started on this week’s activities!

Alive, Alert, Awake!

Alive, Alert, Awake!

Yellowstone is home to many wild animals including moose. Join Moose Fabio and his friends at GoNoodle for an energizing camp warm-up!

Virtual Tour

Virtual Tour

Norris Geyser Basin is the hottest, oldest, and most dynamic of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. Take this virtual tour and get a 360-degree view of hot springs and water eruptions.

Making a Geyser

Making a Geyser

Yellowstone is home to half the world’s geysers! Check out this week’s science experiment to learn what causes these watery eruptions and make a model geyser at home.

Junior Ranger

Junior Ranger

Calling all Junior Rangers! Yellowstone’s booklet is jam-packed with fun park activities. Once completed, follow the directions on the Yellowstone website to receive your very own Junior Ranger patch!

Hot Spring Hues

Hot Spring Hues

The hot springs found throughout Yellowstone are filled with bright colors. The magma under the ground heats up groundwater which can form pools on land called hot springs. Join Buddy for this week’s art project where you’ll learn what causes these magnificent colors then create your own colorful hot spring!

Garbage & Recycling

Garbage & Recycling

In 2019, over 4 million people visited Yellowstone which means a LOT of trash was left behind – more than
8 million pounds! Yellowstone composted or recycled at least half of that amount. Learn how you can dispose of waste responsibly in this week’s eco-challenge.

 

 

Saving One of the Most Scenic Views on the Appalachian Trail

The National Park Trust transferred ownership of 239 acres of land to the National Park Service in one of the most popular areas of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT).

The National Park Service (NPS) often needs a trusted friend to protect land. It is one of the ways National Park Trust works to help our national parks! The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) asked the Park Trust to become the owner of 239 acres of land at Hogan Hollow. This month the ownership was transferred to the National Park Service for permanent protection of the natural views without the disruption of development or logging on the land.

Thousands of hikers each year see Hogan Hollow from McAfee Knob. The 3,197-foot overlook is thought to be one of the most scenic views on the AT. They say people take the more pictures here than any other place on the Appalachian Trail. This view could dramatically change if someone built on the property or cut trees, which happened on neighboring land. This project also protects a section of the trail which runs through the property.

The ATC was awarded a grant from the Virginia Outdoor Foundation to make the purchase. The funds were a part of a legal settlement between Virginia and a company that wanted to build a pipeline nearby to offset the environmental impact of construction. The Conservation Fund managed the sale of the property with the landowners.

NPT Executive Director Grace Lee stated, “We are always willing to provide our expertise and support to benefit national park sites, and are pleased to be able to assist the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and The Conservation Fund in preserving this land for park visitors to enjoy in perpetuity.”

Welcome to Week Two of Camp Buddy Bison

Thanks for joining us for week one of Camp Buddy Bison when we explored Grand Canyon National Park. Over the next three weeks we will discover three other national park sites with our mascot Buddy Bison: Big Cypress National Preserve, Yellowstone National Park, and Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each week, Buddy will have five fun activities for you to enjoy, including experiments, crafts, virtual tours, Jr. Ranger Booklets, and eco-challenges. Complete one or more activity per day.

Did you miss camp last week? Don’t worry, you can view all of the activities here.

Larger than the entire state of Rhode Island, Big Cypress National Preserve in south Florida is the nation’s first national preserve. Covering over 720,000 acres of swampland, the freshwater that flows through the preserve sustains many ecosystems along Florida’s southern coast. Big Cypress is home to both tropical and temperate plant communities and a diversity of wildlife, including the elusive Florida panther.

Click on the images below to learn more about Big Cypress and get started on this week’s activities!

Peace Out

Peace Out

It’s just as important to take time to de-stress as it is to get moving. This week, let your mind wander among the stars with this guided meditation by Cosmic Kids.

Virtual Tour

Virtual Tour

Kirby Storter Roadside Park offers a one-mile boardwalk through tall grass and cypress trees, ending in an overlook where alligators and a variety of wildlife live. Take a virtual stroll on this boardwalk trail and see what animals you can find!

Habitat Matching

Habitat Matching

Big Cypress is made up of five distinct habitats, making it the ideal home for all sorts of birds, mammals, and reptiles. Learn what makes each habitat special; then see if you can match Big Cypress’ wild residents to their homes.

Who's There?

Who's There?

For park rangers, becoming familiar with the unique tracks and sounds made by the animals in their park is all part of the job. Put on your ranger hat and download games from Big Cypress’ website to test your animal identification skills.

Dark Skies Inside

Dark Skies Inside

Did you know that Big Cypress is a designated International Dark Sky Place? If you visit the park at night you can take in stunning views of the Milky Way and thousands of stars! Bring those views to where you live by creating a constellation flashlight.

Lights & Tech

Lights & Tech

In order to become a Dark Sky Place, the rangers at Big Cypress had to do a lot of work to ensure energy-efficient outdoor lighting standards were established. You too can learn how to conserve energy at home by taking these easy steps.

Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway (2020)

National Park Trust added 145 acres to the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway.  The complex project involved a land exchange in which the Park Trust worked with the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands to identify and then purchase valuable timberland; then that land was traded for three parcels of land owned by the State of Wisconsin in the north-central part of Wisconsin. Those three parcels were then transferred from the Park Trust to the National Park Service within days of taking ownership.

Now a part of the scenic riverway, this land adds to the important natural corridor of the Riverway and strengthens the protection of its ecological and scenic values. The Riverway protects over 230 miles of clean, free-flowing water and serves as critical habitat for over 100 species of fish, more than 55 mammals including wolves, and over 40 species of mussels, 5 of them endangered. The rivers, in northwest Wisconsin and east-central Minnesota, flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest.

WASHINGTON, D.C. MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 9, 2020

Media Contact: Olwen Pongrace at 202.253.3190 or olwen@parktrust.org

WASHINGTON, D.C. MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

Washington, D.C. (July 9, 2020)National Park Trust is pleased to announce that Heimy Salgado, a reading specialist at Ida B. Wells Middle School in Washington, D.C., is the recipient of National Park Trust’s 2020 National Educator Award for Outstanding Environmental Stewardship. The annual award recognizes an educator who has made a significant impact on his or her students’ understanding of the natural world and the importance of protecting our nation’s treasured parks.

Thanks to support from the Wyss Foundation, the newly established Ida B. Wells Middle School was able to participate in the Park Trust’s national Buddy Bison School Program during its inaugural school year. However, Heimy Salgado has served as a Buddy Bison School Program teacher at three different schools in the Washington, D.C. area since the inception of the program in 2009. Whenever she was recruited by another D.C. school, she asked if the Park Trust could add that school to the Buddy Bison School Program.  Over the course of her 11-year involvement in the program, Salgado has developed and implemented in-depth advanced reading and science programs and has worked with National Park Trust to help shape and build a more robust and effective program. As a result, Salgado was also chosen as National Park Trust’s first Youth Programs Fellow and served as an advisor to the Park Trust board during the 2017 to 2020 school years.

Over the years, she has introduced hundreds of students from Title I schools to numerous educational park experiences from rock climbing at Carderock Recreation Area (MD) to freshwater snorkeling in George Washington and Jefferson National Forest (WV) to canoeing on the Anacostia River (D.C.). During each adventure, Heimy involved her students and families with conservation, teamwork, and countless classroom lessons broadened by the parks and the outdoors.

Heimy’s class snorkeling in George Washington National Forest.

“We are delighted to recognize Heimy Salgado with our 2020 National Educator Award for Outstanding Environmental Stewardship,” said Grace Lee, executive director, National Park Trust. “For more than a decade, Heimy has been an extraordinary champion of outdoor education and an incredible steward of our parks.  She serves as a wonderful role model for teachers, students, and families. We look forward to working with her and her students for many years to come.”

“I feel so honored to receive this incredible recognition, especially when I think of all the great educators who have received this award before me. Thanks to the National Park Trust, my students have been able to participate in immensely important experiences. These experiences have stuck with them and have helped spark a love for National Parks. In the not too distant future, many of my students will draw inspiration from their experiences as a Buddy Bison student and will do great things to preserve parks and to help children across our nation have access to parks,” shared Heimy Salgado.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

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Welcome to Week One of Camp Buddy Bison!

Over the next four weeks, you will explore four national park sites with our mascot Buddy Bison: Grand Canyon National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, Yellowstone National Park, and Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Each week Buddy will have five fun activities for you to enjoy, including experiments, crafts, virtual tours, Jr. Ranger Booklets, and eco-challenges. Complete one activity per day or learn at your own pace!

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This week we are going to explore Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The South Rim is the most visited section of the park at 7,000 feet above sea level and up to one mile above the valley floor. In addition to the stunning geological features that make the park famous, Grand Canyon has ties to 11 different Native American tribes and is home to over 1,500 plants and 500 animals.

Click on the images to learn more about the Grand Canyon and get started on this week’s camp activities!

Get Moving

Get Moving

Buddy Bison has been working on his TikTok moves and wants you to join him! Learn the steps to the Blinding Lights Challenge and dance along with Buddy Bison. Then post your own recording on social media! Challenge your friends and get creative.

Water Smart

Water Smart

Water shaped the Grand Canyon into what it is today, and every day more and more people use up this limited resource. That’s why it is so important that we use our water wisely and not waste it. There are many simple things you can do to help. Learn how to conserve water at home by building smart water habits!

Virtual Tour

Virtual Tour

The best way to get a view of the Grand Canyon is to soar above it. Luckily, we don’t have to grow wings to take in the sights. Check out this virtual tour and see the park’s natural wonders for yourself!

Landscape Art

Landscape Art

The Grand Canyon’s cliffs, mesas, and valleys have inspired countless artists and photographers. Capture the beauty of the landscape’s rock formations and sunset backdrop using art supplies from home!

Jr. Archaeologist

Jr. Archaeologist

Learn the basics of archaeology by downloading and completing this NPS Junior Ranger Booklet. Once finished with all of the activities, submit your booklet to the National Park Service to receive a Junior Ranger badge for your hard work!The best way to get a view of the Grand Canyon is to soar above it. Luckily, we don’t have to grow wings to take in the sights. Check out this virtual tour and see the park’s natural wonders for yourself!

Canyon Carver

Canyon Carver

The force of the Colorado River has carved the rock of the Grand Canyon over millions of years. Try this experiment at home and observe the effects of water erosion…without the million-year wait.The Grand Canyon’s cliffs, mesas, and valleys have inspired countless artists and photographers. Capture the beauty of the landscape’s rock formations and sunset backdrop using art supplies from home!

NATIONAL PARK TRUST BRINGS SUMMER CAMP TO KIDS AT HOME WITH WEEKLY NATIONAL PARK-THEMED GRAB AND GO ACTIVITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 2, 2020

Media Contact: Olwen Pongrace at 202.253.3190 or olwen@parktrust.org

NATIONAL PARK TRUST BRINGS SUMMER CAMP TO KIDS AT HOME WITH WEEKLY NATIONAL PARK-THEMED GRAB AND GO ACTIVITIES

“Camp Buddy Bison” to Feature Weekly Activities Focused on Getting to Know National Parks, Carbon Footprint Reduction, Virtual Park Tours, Art, Science, and More

Washington, D.C. (July 2, 2020) – While summertime usually means it’s time to head off to camp, we know many kids and families will be at home this summer season due to social distancing measures. That’s why the National Park Trust and their mascot, Buddy Bison are bringing camp to kids with their new Camp Buddy Bison, which features weekly national park-themed activities. This four-week program, which begins July 6th, will be delivered via email and provides participants (most appropriate for upper-elementary aged children) with five weekly free activities that can be completed at home and facilitated by a parent or caregiver.

Each week will include activities centered around carbon footprint reduction, virtual park visits, park-themed activities, science lessons, and crafts. The national parks featured in Camp Buddy Bison include:

  • Week I – Big Cypress National Preserve
  • Week II – Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Week III – Yellowstone National Park
  • Week IV – Grand Canyon National Park

To complete the camp experience, participants can opt to purchase a Buddy Bison t-shirt to wear during camp and National Park Trust will donate a t-shirt to a deserving student in the Buddy Bison School Program.

“During this unique summer camp season where physical distancing is recommended, we want to give kids and families the opportunity to stay engaged with our nation’s parks,” said Grace Lee, Executive Director, National Park Trust. “Our parks are wonderful classrooms and we are thrilled to bring them home to families by providing fun virtual and hands-on activities.”

To learn more about Camp Buddy Bison, please sign up for National Park Trust’s newsletter.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

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20th Bruce F. Vento Public Service Award

June 25th was such a memorable 20th Bruce F. Vento Public Service Award event — our first digital celebration!

A huge “mahalo” to our outstanding award recipient, Senator Mazie K. Hirono of Hawaii. If you missed our video presentation or want to watch it again click below. We were joined by our teachers and students as well as Cindy Orlando, Superintendent of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park for this fun family-friendly event.

A Message From Our Executive Director

Dear Friends:

I hope that you are safe and well during this very difficult year in our nation. At National Park Trust, it has been a time of deep self-reflection and conversation about the challenges we face, not only due to the pandemic, but also because of the systemic racism that plagues our country. We at National Park Trust believe that Black Lives Matter.

Over the past 11 years, we’ve brought tens of thousands of kids of color from under-served communities to our parks to open their eyes to the vast educational and awe-inspiring experiences that await them. For many of them it is their very first park experience, but certainly not their last. It is our mission to change the future one child, one family at a time.

We all know, especially during this time of physical distancing, that getting outdoors is therapeutic and healing — and there certainly has been a heightened awareness and appreciation of the beauty of our parks. They are priceless and irreplaceable, as are the memories we create when we visit them.

Equally important, our national parks also preserve the rich history of this country.  Each national park has a unique story — some of which are painful and make us feel uncomfortable, while others make us proud and appreciative of the great sacrifices of others. These stories need to be told and re-told, especially now. Our parks are wonderful classrooms for hands-on science, history, civics, and so much more. They are worthy of preserving, and every child and family should experience all they have to offer.

Our 37-year partnership with the National Park Service has protected both cultural and natural park resources. Our land acquisition projects are as diverse as the parks themselves. For example, many years ago we helped expand the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park in Atlanta, the birthplace of civil rights leader Dr. King. More recently, we added 145 acres to the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway in Wisconsin, protecting hundreds of species of aquatic and wildlife, and providing recreational enjoyment for the community.

Thank you for staying connected with us during this challenging time and for your continued support. Our work would not be possible without you. There’s much more that needs to be done, but together we will ensure that the beauty and important stories of our national parks are preserved.  And, just as important, we will work toward a future in which all children, regardless of race or wealth, grow up to understand that the parks belong to them, and they belong in the parks.

I invite you to share your thoughts and ideas with me on how we can be more effective and responsive to these issues facing our nation.

With gratitude and appreciation,


 

 

Grace Lee
Executive Director

National Park Trust Assists National Park Service in Securing Properties for St. Croix National Scenic Riverway

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 15, 2020

Contact: Phil Selleck, phil@parktrust.org, 301-279-7275 x14

Washington, D.C., April 15, 2020 –National Park Trust today announced the addition of 145 acres to the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway. The Park Trust received the three parcels of land from the State of Wisconsin, the original owners of the property. The complex project involved a land exchange in which the Park Trust worked with the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands to identify and then purchase valuable timberland; then that land was traded for the state parcels in the north-central part of Wisconsin. The Park Trust transferred the three parcels to the National Park Service within days of taking ownership; they are now a part of the scenic riverway.

Among the rivers first designated under the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, the St. Croix and Namekagon form the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway. The Riverway protects over 230 miles of clean, free-flowing water and serves as critical habitat for over 100 species of fish, more than 55 mammals including wolves, and over 40 species of mussels, 5 of them endangered. The rivers, in northwest Wisconsin and east central Minnesota, flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest.

“This land adds to the important natural corridor of the Riverway and strengthens protection of its ecological and scenic values. It would not have been possible without the collaboration and commitment of our partners at the National Park Trust and the State of Wisconsin. We are very thankful for their efforts,” said Julie Galonska, superintendent of the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway.

The State of Wisconsin will also benefit from the productive timberland it acquired by the exchange on the Riverway. Revenue from the timber sales will be used to support K-12 school libraries around the state as well as the University of Wisconsin.

Donors to the Park Trust’s Treasure Forever Fund made this land acquisition possible. The newly established fund provides park and conservation partners with financing to act quickly in response to rare and time-sensitive conservation opportunities. After the Park Trust buys the property, the funds are “revolved” or returned to the fund after the land is purchased from the Park Trust by the National Park Service. “We are so grateful for the philanthropic contributions from our board and donors that made the Treasure Forever Fund possible. They are the ‘gifts that keep on giving’ as we use them to acquire more critical lands for the parks including this important project to expand the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway,” said Grace Lee, executive director of National Park Trust.

This free-flowing riverway, though logged many years ago, remains a high-quality aquatic habitat; mussel species that lived there 400 years ago are still living there today. The rivers are also known for outdoor recreation, including excellent opportunities for canoeing, kayaking, and fishing, along with powerboating. Multi-day water trips are possible with campsites located along the river’s edge. Visitors hike, picnic, and enjoy the natural beauty at a variety of scenic viewpoints, including the Wisconsin Dells of the St. Croix. Learn more at www.nps.gov/sacn.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST
National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. It is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of protecting national parks through land acquisition and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, the Park Trust has preserved over 30,000 acres in 31 states, one U.S. Territory and Washington, DC. In 2019, National Park Trust engaged over 1 million people in their annual Kids to Parks Day, giving nearly 20,000 under-served kids trips to parks through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

 

 

 

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Discover America’s Lakes and Seashores with Buddy Bison!

As June quickly approaches, you may find yourself daydreaming about swimming in lakes or taking long walks on the beach. Did you know that some of the country’s most beautiful lakes and seashores are protected as national parks?

This week with our mascot Buddy Bison, learn about the difference between freshwater and saltwater parks and discover an endangered sea turtle that calls Padre Island National Seashore (TX) home.

Summer is a great time to explore different kinds of national parks such as national lakes and seashores. Parks including Crater Lake National Park (OR) and Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NV, AZ) have freshwater ecosystems. Other parks like Fire Island National Seashore (NY) and Gulf Islands National Seashore (FL, MS) have saltwater ecosystems.

The type of water found in a park (and its density) determine what animals can survive there. Learn how salt can affect water density by doing a simple experiment with an egg and a glass of water.  Click below for all of the details.

Padre Island National Seashore in Texas is not only the longest stretch of undeveloped barrier island in the world, but it is also a nesting ground for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle. The Kemp’s ridley is critically endangered and nests at Padre Island more than any other location in the United States.

Learn about the features that distinguish this sea turtle from other sea turtle species, then make a lifesize model using materials from home.

Celebrate Memorial Day With Buddy Bison

The Memorial Day holiday marks the beginning of warmer weather, outdoor adventures, and the approach of summer days. More importantly it is a day of remembrance and occurs during National Military Appreciation Month. This is a time when we reflect on the things that we value about our country and pay tribute to those who protect it every day.

Celebrate Memorial Day with our mascot Buddy Bison by writing a patriotic poem and learning about how Civil War soldiers communicated while on the battlefield.

Memorial Day is a time of remembrance for those who lost their lives while serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. Many national park sites were established to preserve these stories and the sacrifices made by service members throughout our nation’s history.

Create a shape poem about the United States and reflect on what makes you proud of our country.  Is it the diversity of your community or the beauty of our national parks? Grab a pencil, let the creativity begin, and share your poem with a loved one.

Without modern technology, Civil War soldiers had to find creative ways to communicate in secret. Learn about signal flags with Buddy Bison and discover how soldiers who fought in the Battle of Antietam (which took place in Maryland) used flags, codes, and ciphers to send and encrypt messages. Then create your own flag, establish a secret code, and send coded messages to your friends and family.

 

Thank You For Making Parks To Kids Day A Wonderful Success!

THANK YOU to all of the kids, families, and partners who celebrated #ParksToKids Day this past weekend! The 10th anniversary of Kids to Parks Day might not have been what we originally imagined, but because of YOU, the day was a huge success!

10 Ways to Celebrate Parks to Kids Day

May 16th is Kids to Parks Day and this year we’re bringing the parks to you by celebrating it as Parks to Kids Day! In honor of our 10th anniversary, we are providing 10 ways to explore the outdoors without leaving your neighborhood.

1. DOWNLOAD AND EXPLORE THE PARKPASSPORT APP

New updates for Parks to Kids Day! Discover more than 500 virtual experiences and earn custom badges to add to your digital park passport.
   

2. BUILD A MINI-PARK WITH BUDDY BISON

Celebrate Parks to Kids Day by building a mini-park! Use your imagination and materials from home to construct a park in your living room, backyard, or even a family parking spot – just have fun and be creative!

3. BUDDY BISON’S BLINDING LIGHTS DANCE CHALLENGE

Go outside, get active, and get your “park-on” for Parks to Kids Day by joining our mascot Buddy Bison for the Blinding Lights Dance Challenge.  Learn the steps, record your dance, and show off your dance moves by sharing on social media (TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter). Tag us in your post (@NationalParkTrust) and use #ParksToKids and #BuddyBison.

READY FOR MORE? CHECK OUT THESE ADDITIONAL ACTIVITIES

Backyard Scavenger Hunt

Backyard Scavenger Hunt

There are so many interesting things you can find in nature. When walking or hiking, make sure you stay quiet, look around your surroundings, and see what you can discover.

Design a Nature Collage

Design a Nature Collage

A great activity to do while in your backyard or neighborhood is to collect and bring home any interesting or unique pieces of nature. At home, use your collected materials, construction paper, and glue to create a one of a kind nature collage.

Flower Activities to Celebrate Teachers and Moms

As the month of May begins, flowers are in bloom, bees are buzzing, and teachers and parents across the nation are hard at work making the most of the remaining days of the school year. This week is National Teacher Appreciation Week and Mother’s Day. The work we do through our school programs would not be possible without the collaboration of amazingly dedicated educators and the support of moms everywhere. That dedication continues as teachers and parents are creatively turning their own homes into classrooms.

For this special week, our mascot Buddy Bison is excited to help your children express their appreciation by creating a unique “thank you” card featuring a national park flower. Next, discover a special flower from Mount Rainer National Park, the White Avalanche lily. Learn about the parts of this pacific northwest flower, perform a flower dissection, then take a virtual tour of the park to experience the brilliant wildflower meadows without leaving your home.

Help your kids celebrate Teacher Appreciation Week and thank their teachers with the help of Buddy Bison. Create a national park wildflower “thank you” card, scan or take a picture of their work, and then email it to their teacher.  Your kids can even show their appreciation during an upcoming online class.

Download the template and decorate the Trillium flower, found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (located in NC & TN) using construction paper, stickers, magazine cut-outs, foil, crayons, and other supplies from home.

BONUS: We have also included a template for a Mother’s Day card!

     

Parks such as Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Mount Rainer National Park (WA) boast some of the world’s most beautiful wildflowers. But there’s more to these blooms than meets the eye.

With the help of Buddy Bison, learn about the parts of the White Avalanche lily. Then using real flowers from your backyard or neighborhood, perform a dissection at home to see the parts of a flower firsthand. Download the instructions below.

Mount Rainier National Park in Washington state is distinguished by its high peak, glaciers, and wildflower meadows. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the lower 48 states, bringing life to five major rivers. Subalpine wildflower meadows surround the icy volcano while ancient forest covers Mount Rainier’s lower slopes.

Enjoy this virtual tour of this breathtaking park! Click on the image to get started.

 

10 Incredible Waterfalls Found in National Parks

Waterfalls are often the most popular attractions in national parks and perhaps are some of the best examples of the forces of nature. Whether you come across water descending a series of rock steps or a large and powerful waterfall, their variety and uniqueness will blow you away. 

Enjoy this list of 10 awesome waterfalls at national park sites across the country. Maybe a new bucket list for after quarantine?

Yosemite National Park, CA

Yosemite National Park, CA

Out of all the national park sites across the country, Yosemite National Park is the park best known for its countless waterfalls. Yosemite Falls is the most famous and most photographed of Yosemite's waterfalls. It is a three-tiered, 2,425ft waterfall which makes it the highest waterfall in North America. In fact, water drops 1,430ft at the Upper Falls, placing Yosemite Falls among the top 20 highest waterfalls in the world. But like all good things, hiking to Upper Falls is no easy feat. It requires taking a 7.2-mile round trip, with a 2,700ft elevation gain.
Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, NJ

Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, NJ

The Great Falls of the Passaic River is the second largest waterfall, by volume, east of the Mississippi River and next to Niagara Falls. It is centered in an industrial historic district, considered to be "The Cradle of American Industry." The falls played a significant role in the early industrial development of New Jersey starting in the earliest days of the nation.
Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN and NC

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN and NC

With high levels of rainfall and elevation gradient throughout Great Smoky Mountains National Park, waterfalls and cascades form everywhere. There are more than 100 prominent waterfalls and cascades within the park boundaries. One of the most notable is Grotto Falls, a beautiful 25-foot cascade where you can duck behind the waterfall. Do some research before your trip to scout out the hidden gem waterfalls away from the crowds!
Grand Canyon National Park, AZ

Grand Canyon National Park, AZ

When thinking of the Grand Canyon, most people think first of the canyon itself. However, one of the more magical parts of this park is the water that flows through it: river, creeks, springs, and waterfalls. Some of the most notable are Deer Creek Falls and Havasu Falls - powerful waterfalls that create an enchanting atmosphere you will never forget.
Cuyahoga Valley National Park, OH

Cuyahoga Valley National Park, OH

Brandywine Falls is the most famous waterfall at Cuyahoga Valley National Park and a must see during any visit to this park. The falls also change beautifully with the seasons, and can be visited time and time again for a completely different experience. This 65-foot high waterfall fed by Brandywine Creek has a thin layer of shale that gives it a bridal-veil appearance.
Haleakalā National Park, HI

Haleakalā National Park, HI

The Kīpahulu District of Haleakalā National Park is a fantastic place to see some waterfalls. The most popular - Waimoku Falls - is a majestic 400ft waterfall suited at the head of Ohe'o Gulch. This area has also been inhabited by native people for hundreds of years and allows visitors to learn about native culture.
Devils Postpile National Monument, CA

Devils Postpile National Monument, CA

The San Joaquin River runs through Devils Postpile National Park, fueling the 101-foot Rainbow Falls. This attractive single drop waterfall leaps over volcanic cliffs and flashes frequent rainbows. The falls is only a 2.5 mile hike away from the ranger station, and is a must see on any visit.
Great Falls Park, VA

Great Falls Park, VA

This incredible 800 acre park located just off the Potomac River is a locals favorite. The river flows between Virginia and Maryland for many miles, at one point forming Great Falls. A mixture of high speed, force, and steep, jagged rocks is what makes Great Falls a must see. Located in a relatively urban area, this is a fantastic park for those who want to see waterfalls but cannot access some of the more remote parks.
Yellowstone National Park, ID, MT, WY

Yellowstone National Park, ID, MT, WY

Yellowstone National Park's most famous waterfall is the impressive 308-foot drop Lower Yellowstone River Falls. If you are looking for something a little more discrete, with a bit of a hefty distance, the park also includes many lesser known falls that are waiting to take your breath away. But not to worry, you can still get about a dozen spectacular waterfall views straight from the road. The roaring waters of Yellowstone provide great destinations no matter the time of year.
Katmai National Park and Preserve, AK

Katmai National Park and Preserve, AK

Waterfalls at Katmai are not just a sightseeing destination, they’re a fishing area for grizzly bears. July is peak season to visit Brooks Falls and watch the bears compete over the best fishing spots. At Katmai, you can get a fix of an incredible waterfall and wildlife in one visit. Up to 25 bears have been recorded at Brooks Falls trying to fish leaping salmon from the 6-foot falls.

Photos: NPS

10TH ANNIVERSARY OF NATIONAL PARK TRUST’S KIDS TO PARKS DAY GOES DIGITAL ON SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2020 AS ‘PARKS TO KIDS DAY’

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 4, 2020

Media Contact: Olwen Pongrace, 202.253.3190 or olwen@parktrust.org

10TH ANNIVERSARY OF NATIONAL PARK TRUST’S KIDS TO PARKS DAY GOES DIGITAL ON SATURDAY, MAY 16, 2020 AS ‘PARKS TO KIDS DAY’

Virtual Celebration Provides Fun Resources and Activities that Help Families Celebrate the Day While Practicing Social Distancing

Washington, D.C. (May 4, 2020) – With many parks and landmarks across the country closed due to COVID-19 social distancing measures, National Park Trust has officially declared the 10th anniversary of Kids to Parks Day as ‘Parks To Kids Day’ to be held on Saturday, May 16th, 2020. The celebration brings a much-needed infusion of the outdoors to kids and families as they isolate close to home.

Understanding that nothing can replace an actual park experience, National Park Trust has developed a variety of family activities and distance learning opportunities available at www.kidstoparks.org. These activities can be completed at home, in a backyard or neighborhood, and help families celebrate the day safely. In addition to the online resources, National Park Trust has updated its free mobile ParkPassport App with new virtual park experiences and fun digital badges available through the Apple App Store and Google Play.

“Last year, Kids to Parks Day featured over 1500 park events in all 50 states with well over a million participants,” said Grace Lee, National Park Trust Executive Director. “While there is no replacement for enjoying a day with friends and family at a park, we wanted to help families create park experiences at home by providing fun, engaging and educational activities that families can do together to celebrate the day. The HOW may be different this year, but the WHY is more important than ever before. We hope families will join us for this national day of outdoor play and park appreciation.”

National Park Trust encourages families to share their ‘Parks to Kids Day’ experiences on social media using #ParksToKids.

Mayors from more than  265 cities and towns – including Montgomery (AL), Wichita (KS), Newark (NJ), Olympia (WA), College Park (MD), Edgewater (CO), Alexandria(VA), Henderson (NV), Newark (NJ), Santa Fe (NM), and Cedar Rapids(IA) have signed proclamations of support and plan a digital approach to celebrate ‘Parks to Kids Day’.

ABOUT NATIONAL PARK TRUST

National Park Trust is a non-profit dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow. The Park Trust is the only land trust with a comprehensive mission of preserving national parks through land protection and creating a pipeline of future park stewards by connecting kids to parks. Since 1983, National Park Trust has benefitted 48 national park sites across 28 states, one U.S. Territory, and Washington, D.C. Annually, the Park Trust provides an estimated 20,000 under-served kids with park trips through their nationally recognized Buddy Bison Programs and Kids to Parks Day National School Contest, both of which support Title I schools. Find out more at www.parktrust.org.

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Discover Fossils and Prehistoric Parks with Buddy Bison

Join our woolly mascot Buddy Bison as he takes you back in time to when dinosaurs, mammoths, and other primitive animals roamed the land. Discover what it’s like to uncover fossils by recreating a frozen fossil dig site. Then, “think like a paleontologist” by learning about three prehistoric animals that have been identified in national parks and imagine what they looked like.

Many, many years ago, giant creatures lived on the land we now call home. Their preserved remains, which in some places can still be visibly seen embedded in rocks, have been found in numerous national parks across the country. These preserved remains are called fossils.

Scientists, including paleontologists, are always digging up new fossils and discovering creatures that used to live within our parks. Join Buddy Bison and become a scientist for a day! Recreate a frozen fossil dig and make your own discoveries from home! Click the link below to Download the instructions.

Now that you have some experience finding or excavating fossils, you’re ready to take a closer look and imagine what some of these prehistoric creatures looked like when they walked the earth. In this activity, examine the fossils on the worksheet and then “think like a paleontologist”. Use your imagination to draw your own scientific illustrations. Click on the link below to download.

10 NATIONAL PARKS WITH EPIC STARGAZING

National parks are often found in some of the most remote areas of the United States and protect from light pollution that preserves the quality of the night sky.

The 10 parks below are each dedicated to preserving high-quality night sky darkness. Certified by the International Dark-Sky Association as International Dark Sky Parks, these national parks deliver incredible opportunities to spot meteors, see stars and ponder constellations.

Death Valley National Park, CA

Death Valley National Park, CA

Death Valley National Park is the largest Dark Sky designated area with a span of 13,700 square kilometers. Death Valley National Park is known as the hottest national park, so cool nighttime temperatures make stargazing sound even more appealing! The salt flats of serve as wonderful viewing locations for the park’s night skies.
Chaco Culture National Historical Park, NM

Chaco Culture National Historical Park, NM

Chaco has long been considered by many night sky enthusiasts to be one of the best places in America to stargaze. Today, amidst this ancient landscape, visitors can experience the same dark sky that the Chacoans observed a thousand years ago. The protection of dark night skies is a priority at Chaco not only for the enjoyment of star-gazing visitors but for the natural environment as well. Nocturnal wildlife relies on darkness for survival, and the natural rhythms of humans and plants depend on an unaltered night sky. By designating over 99% of the park as a "natural darkness zone", in which no permanent outdoor lighting exists, Chaco is ensuring the preservation of these nocturnal ecosystems.
Big Bend National Park, TX

Big Bend National Park, TX

Big Bend is known as one of the most outstanding places in North America for stargazing. It has the least light pollution of any other National Park unit in the lower 48 states. Realistically one can see approximately 2000 stars on a clear night here compared to perhaps a few hundred in a medium-sized city. Recently, Big Bend National Park has begun the process of eliminating all forms of light pollution to help visitors experience night sky free from modern intrusion.
Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, NM

Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, NM

Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument is a 1,077-acre historic site in central New Mexico. Although the Park is within the outer light dome of the Albuquerque metropolitan area, its Silver-tier skies are an increasing draw for visitors who hear of interpretive programs about how the current night sky differs from what the natives saw before the Spanish conquest. On September 30, 2016, the new Superintendent of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, Tom Betts, proudly announced their new designation as a Dark Sky Park.
Obed Wild and Scenic River, TN

Obed Wild and Scenic River, TN

Obed Wild and Scenic River is the second park east of Colorado to earn the status of an International Dark Sky Park. The park preserves natural nighttime darkness over one of the last free-flowing wild river systems in the eastern United States. Obed's exceptional dark-sky conditions and a strong commitment to preserving the park's night sky resource makes this one of the best places to stargaze!
Natural Bridges National Monument, UT

Natural Bridges National Monument, UT

Imagine sitting at the campground after a long day of hiking and gazing up at the sky. The sky that you would be looking at is about as dark as it was 800 years ago for the ancestral Puebloans who called this land home. This is one of the reasons that Natural Bridges National Monument became the first International Dark Sky Park certified by the International Dark-Sky Association. Want to visit? Natural Bridges trails are open day and night and stargazing and exploring the night sky is allowed virtually anywhere in the park.
Canyonlands National Park, UT

Canyonlands National Park, UT

The national parks and monuments of the Colorado Plateau have long been popular destinations for travelers. In addition to their stunning landscapes and rich cultural history, these areas share another resource: some of the darkest skies remaining in the contiguous 48 United States. The utter darkness of a moonless night in Canyonlands surprises many visitors. At Canyonlands National Park, the naked eye is sufficient to witness a wealth of stars. Under the right conditions, common binoculars may even reveal the rings of Saturn.
Grand Canyon National Park, AZ

Grand Canyon National Park, AZ

In June 2019, Grand Canyon National Park became an official International Dark Sky Park. By day you can stand anywhere along the South Rim and peer down nearly 2,000m into its layer-cake bands of red rock, taking you back two billion years into Earth’s deepest history. When the Sun goes down, the combination of a high elevation and dry desert air means clear, cloudless night skies perfect for viewing the Milky Way. Today, Grand Canyon is one of the most complex, highly-visited, pristine night-sky sanctuaries on the planet.
Great Basin National Park, NV

Great Basin National Park, NV

On a clear, moonless night in Great Basin National Park, thousands of stars, numerous planets, star clusters, meteors, man-made satellites, the Andromeda Galaxy, and the Milky Way can be seen with the naked eye. The area boasts some of the darkest night skies in the western United States. Low humidity and minimal light pollution, combined with high elevation, create a unique window to the universe.
Joshua Tree National Park, CA

Joshua Tree National Park, CA

Boasting some of the darkest nights in southern California, Joshua Tree National Park offers many visitors the chance to admire the Milky Way for the first time in their lives. For residents of the greater Los Angeles area – some 18 million people – Joshua Tree is the nearest convenient place to go stargazing under a relatively dark sky. While the western half of the Park is significantly impacted by light from Palm Springs and, to a lesser extent, the cities of the nearby Morongo Basin, visitors who make the trek to the Park’s eastern wilderness area are rewarded with some of the darkest night skies left in the region.

Photos: NPS

Buddy Bison’s Veggie Garden and Junior Ranger Badges You Can Earn From Home

Participate in some environmental fun at home by getting a little dirty and doing some exploring with our woolly mascot Buddy Bison.

Make the most of kitchen scraps by creating your own vegetable garden with Buddy Bison! Decorate with natural materials and learn about different seeds that will flourish on your windowsill or on your counter.

Post a picture and share it with us on Instagram by tagging @nationalparktrust or using the hashtag #BuddyBison.

To celebrate National Park Week, we are thrilled to share 10 Junior Ranger badges you can earn from home. It doesn’t matter what age you are, just “explore, learn, and protect” your national parks online and become an official Junior Ranger and earn your badges!

From Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Kansas to Point Reyes National Seashore in California, you can learn about history, night skies, or even dinosaurs!

New Bedford  Whaling National Historical Park, MA

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, MA

Learn about New Bedford’s past! Junior Rangers of all ages can plan a whaling adventure and learn what it takes to land a whale! Unlike traditional Junior Ranger books that are only available at a park, this e-book can be accessed from anywhere on your personal smartphone or tablet. Once you have completed your journey, fill in your name on the certificate, print it out, and mail it back to the park to get your Junior Ranger badge.
Fort Matanzas National Monument, FL

Fort Matanzas National Monument, FL

Explore the history and nature of Fort Matanzas by getting a Junior Ranger badge! Download the activity book and complete five of the blue or red activities. Once you are done, head over to their website and finish your badge journey by completing the remaining tasks of the 'website exploration' requirement. Send the completed book and other required material to the address listed on the website to receive your badge.
President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace, AR

President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace, AR

By downloading a copy of the Junior Ranger booklet, you will learn about the story of young Bill Clinton and how he was influenced by his family and community. Complete the activities and send it back to the address on the website to earn a badge.
Cesar E. Chavez National Monument, CA

Cesar E. Chavez National Monument, CA

Earn a badge for César E. Chávez National Monument by completing activities in our junior ranger book! Print out the booklet (on legal-size paper) at home and mail the completed book back to the park. A ranger will review and mail back your very own César E. Chávez National Monument badge!
Petrified Forest National Park, AZ

Petrified Forest National Park, AZ

Petrified Forest National Park welcomes kids to learn more about the ancient environment of the Late Triassic — when the petrified trees were alive and giant reptiles roamed the land. Download the Petrified National Forest Junior Ranger activity book from their website to learn about fossils, human history, wilderness, and more! Once completed, mail the booklet back to the address on the website to earn a badge.
Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, AK

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, AK

Become a Wrangell-St. Elias National Park Junior Ranger by completing the online version of the Junior Ranger Booklet. Just click on the workbook and print out the pages. Complete the activities, answer the questions, and mail it the address listed on their website. A park ranger will review your answers and send you a badge and certificate in return.
Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, AK

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, AK

Explore, learn, and protect! Earn a badge by downloading and completing the Junior Ranger activity book on the website. This book features activities for all ages and skills. Learn about the gold rush while earning gold nuggets for each activity. The older you are, the more nuggets you need to earn to get your badge. Once finished, email the completed version to the contact listed on the website to receive your badge.
Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, KS

Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, KS

Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve is always looking for special Junior Rangers. Head over to their website to earn a Junior Ranger badge. You must complete five activities found in the downloadable booklet and mail them back to the preserve. Rangers will check your work and send you an official Tallgrass Prairie Junior Ranger badge!
Montezuma Castle National Monument, AZ

Montezuma Castle National Monument, AZ

At Montezuma Castle National Monument, you can become a Junior Ranger by completing the Junior Ranger Activity Guide found on the website and completing the activities. This incredible guide can help you learn more about the prehistoric people who lived in the area over 800 years ago! Once completed, mail the booklet back to the address on the website to receive your badge.
Point Reyes National Seashore, CA

Point Reyes National Seashore, CA

Become a Point Reyes Virtual Junior Ranger by downloading, printing, completing, and mailing in their Junior Ranger booklet to receive your badge. You will be able to explore the history of the Coast Miwok people and study the park's marine life. You can also become an Underwater Explorer Junior Ranger by downloading and completing the Underwater Explorer Junior Ranger activity booklet.

10 National Park Service Mega Transportation Projects

“Mega” transportation projects are initiatives at the National Park Service that require a large amount of funding beyond the capacity of the Federal Lands Transportation Program’s (FLTP) annual allocation. Megaprojects include nationally significant transportation infrastructures that have become functionally obsolete or have exceeded their design life and require large investments to bring them back to good condition.

A megaproject’s cost can range from $25 million to replace a bridge up to nearly $1 billion to modernize a road system for safety and current standards. The benefits of improving the NPS aging transportation infrastructure are far-reaching and opportunities to improve and modernize large park transportation facilities require partnering with many stakeholders and government entities.

Still not sure what we mean? Check out this list of 10 recent park transportation megaprojects.

Denali National Park, AK

Denali National Park, AK

The 92-mile long Denali Park Road in Denali National Park takes you through scenic vistas and prime wildlife viewing areas. It is also the only road in the 6-million-acre park. The first 15 miles of the road is paved and in dire need of reconstruction. Thousands of people travel through this impressive drive each year and have caused the road to quickly begin to deteriorate. This 2016 project helped provide safe year-round vehicle access by addressing the failing roadway, enhancing distance vista viewing opportunities, decreasing congestion, and eliminating traffic and pedestrian conflicts.

Blue Ridge Parkway, NC & VA

Blue Ridge Parkway, NC & VA

The construction of the Blue Ridge Parkway began in 1934 and road conditions have deteriorated significantly. Built with the purpose of providing opportunities to enjoy the scenic beauty of the southern Appalachian Mountains, the nearly 50 million visitors each year have been deteriorating the pavement conditions of the road. Because of limited funding, only 15 miles of the 469 miles undergo pavement on average each year. The result is that some sections of the parkway go without repaving for more than 30 years. This project has been an ongoing priority for the park service since 2016.

Mount Rainier National Park, WA

Mount Rainier National Park, WA

Deterioration of roadways and bridges along multiple routes on the east side of Mount Rainier National Park, as well as increasing intensity of White River storm flows, are threatening the public’s continued access to this unique area. Rehabilitation work is needed to ensure ongoing use of the roads, which is vital to park operations, the local economy, and to visitor use and enjoyment. This project includes the rehabilitation of the 15.4 miles of the Sunrise Road, a breathtaking scenic road of Mount Rainier that takes you to an elevation of 6,400 feet.

Natchez Trace Parkway, AL, MS, & TN

Natchez Trace Parkway, AL, MS, & TN

The scenic 444-mile route between Natchez, Mississippi, and Nashville, Tennessee traces the early pathways of the Natchez, Chickasaw, and Choctaw Indian tribes. In the early 2000s, a Multi-Use Trail Feasibility Study was prepared by the Federal Highway Administration to examine the feasibility of constructing multi-use trails parallel to the Natchez Trace Parkway motor road. The study recommended that three sections
along the Parkway should have a parallel trail because of traffic volumes, accident data, and national recreational trends. Many sections of multi-use trail have been constructed but there are a few parts yet to be completed.

George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA, D.C., & MD

George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA, D.C., & MD

The Arlington Memorial Bridge is one of the only five bridges connecting Virginia and the District of Columbia across the Potomac River. Constructed in 1932, the bridge has finally reached the end of its design life. Repairs have been performed gradually throughout the years but its quick degradation requires extensive rehabilitation to include full replacement of its center span. As of April 2020, construction and bridge closures are ongoing as the project continues to move forward.

Isle Royale National Park, MI

Isle Royale National Park, MI

Water-based transportation is the primary mode of transportation to and from Isle Royale National Park and it is important in order to maintain its wilderness environment. Currently, the Ranger III transports visitors, employees, and everything needed to operate the park and support the park visitors. This vessel has been in continuous service for nearly 62 years and is now in need of replacement. As of April 2020, the Ranger III continues to be in operation and the first outbound trip of the year is scheduled for 6/30/20 from Houghton, MI.

Manassas National Battlefield, VA

Manassas National Battlefield, VA

Presently, the non-park-related local commuting vehicle traffic along US 29 and SR 234 in Virginia, which bisects the Manassas National Battlefield, has had negative impacts on the park for decades. The proposed alternative to relieve this issue includes the construction of the MANA Bypass. This project will reroute US 29 around the Manassas National Battlefield by constructing a nine-mile, four-lane bypass. Visitor experience and safety would be enhanced by this construction and without the heavy commuter and commercial truck traffic that run through the park, a more appropriate experience of the battlefield landscape that more closely resembles its historic appearance will be created.

Foothills Parkway, TN

Foothills Parkway, TN

The Foothills Parkway is one of the seven congressionally mandated scenic parkways in the country. The entire 72-mile parkway corridor is administered by Great Smoky Mountains National Park and it is the only remaining parkway yet to be fully completed. Only three of eight segments are open to the public, totaling 22.5 miles. The National Park Service, Tennessee Department of Transportation, and the Federal Highway Administration have been seeking funding to pave and open an additional 16.1 miles known as Sections E and F. A portion of this project was completed in 2018 and the infamous “missing link” is no longer missing.

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, NJ & PA

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, NJ & PA

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area is among the most visited parks in the National Park System with an estimated visitation of 5.1 million visitors a year. With the high traffic the park welcomes, the safety and maintenance of the roads must be continuously addressed. Currently, the three main arterials within DEWA make up a significant portion of the park’s road system. Those include the Old mine Road, River Road, and US Route 209. All collectively referred to as the Arterial Loop Road. These three roads are historical and cultural landmarks of the region and they are all aging and deteriorating rapidly. This project would improve visitor safety by significantly reducing the total number of accidents, injuries, and deaths, and would minimize driver distractions due to rough road conditions.

Colonial National Historical Park, VA

Colonial National Historical Park, VA

The views along the Colonial Parkway continue to inspire, but the surface of the Parkway, built between 1931 and 1957, is rated “poor” for 87% of its 23 miles. The 50-year design life expired a generation ago for much of the Parkway. Built between 1931 and 1957, construction stopped and started due to numerous problems. Construction projects have continued to the present, with minor construction and repair projects documented in each decade following the 1950s. Today, the exposed aggregate concrete surface still reminds drivers of the dirt roads of a by-gone era. But the road, initially designed for leisure driving, is under constant assault. The Parkway has become an important local commuter route; the busiest sections carry 1.9 to 2.2 million vehicles per year. Major rehabilitation and reconstruction are essential to preserving this scenic and historic drive. There are currently major issues of surface drainage, drop inlets, and culverts that require repair, replacement, or enlargement at many locations throughout the parkway. Considerable preservation work is needed in an effort to save as much of the historic fabric as practical.

Photos: National Park Service

Kids To Parks Day Is Now Parks To Kids Day

COVID-19 has impacted everyone and has limited our ability to interact with our beloved national, local and state parks. With this in mind, National Park Trust has decided to take the 10th anniversary of Kids to Parks Day digital and instead celebrate May 16, 2020, as Parks to Kids Day–bringing a much-needed infusion of the outdoors to kids and families as they isolate at home and practice social distancing.

We know that this is not ideal, but we also know that together we can still support our communities during this challenging time. We encourage kids and families to continue your celebration and join us by bringing the parks home on May 16th.

Leading up to Parks to Kids Day, National Park Trust will be pulsing out numerous at-home activities and distance learning opportunities to help bring the outdoors and parks closer to home.

Visit kidstoparks.org for all the information.

Stay healthy and safe!


Grace Lee, Executive Director

10 Junior Ranger Badges You Can Earn From Home

Celebrate National Park Week and become a Junior Ranger!

The Junior Ranger Program is a great way to explore national parks. You can learn about history, night skies, or even dinosaurs! You’ll also learn why national parks were created and how you can be a part of the team that keeps our national parks healthy.

Enjoy this list of 10 Junior Ranger badges you can earn from home. It doesn’t matter what age you are – just “explore, learn, and protect” your national parks online and become an official Junior Ranger and receive your badges!

New Bedford  Whaling National Historical Park, MA

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, MA

Learn about New Bedford’s past! Junior Rangers of all ages can plan a whaling adventure and learn what it takes to land a whale! Unlike traditional Junior Ranger books that are only available at a park, this e-book can be accessed from anywhere on your personal smartphone or tablet. Once you have completed your journey, fill in your name on the certificate, print it out, and mail it back to the park to get your Junior Ranger badge.
Fort Matanzas National Monument, FL

Fort Matanzas National Monument, FL

Explore the history and nature of Fort Matanzas by getting a Junior Ranger badge! Download the activity book and complete five of the blue or red activities. Once you are done, head over to their website and finish your badge journey by completing the remaining tasks of the 'website exploration' requirement. Send the completed book and other required material to the address listed on the website to receive your badge.
President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace, AR

President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace, AR

By downloading a copy of the Junior Ranger booklet, you will learn about the story of young Bill Clinton and how he was influenced by his family and community. Complete the activities and send it back to the address on the website to earn a badge.
Cesar E. Chavez National Monument, CA

Cesar E. Chavez National Monument, CA

Earn a badge for César E. Chávez National Monument by completing activities in our junior ranger book! Print out the booklet (on legal-size paper) at home and mail the completed book back to the park. A ranger will review and mail back your very own César E. Chávez National Monument badge!
Petrified Forest National Park, AZ

Petrified Forest National Park, AZ

Petrified Forest National Park welcomes kids to learn more about the ancient environment of the Late Triassic — when the petrified trees were alive and giant reptiles roamed the land. Download the Petrified National Forest Junior Ranger activity book from their website to learn about fossils, human history, wilderness, and more! Once completed, mail the booklet back to the address on the website to earn a badge.
Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, AK

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, AK

Become a Wrangell-St. Elias National Park Junior Ranger by completing the online version of the Junior Ranger Booklet. Just click on the workbook and print out the pages. Complete the activities, answer the questions, and mail it the address listed on their website. A park ranger will review your answers and send you a badge and certificate in return.
Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, AK

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, AK

Explore, learn, and protect! Earn a badge by downloading and completing the Junior Ranger activity book on the website. This book features activities for all ages and skills. Learn about the gold rush while earning gold nuggets for each activity. The older you are, the more nuggets you need to earn to get your badge. Once finished, email the completed version to the contact listed on the website to receive your badge.
Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, KS

Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, KS

Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve is always looking for special Junior Rangers. Head over to their website to earn a Junior Ranger badge. You must complete five activities found in the downloadable booklet and mail them back to the preserve. Rangers will check your work and send you an official Tallgrass Prairie Junior Ranger badge!
Montezuma Castle National Monument, AZ

Montezuma Castle National Monument, AZ

At Montezuma Castle National Monument, you can become a Junior Ranger by completing the Junior Ranger Activity Guide found on the website and completing the activities. This incredible guide can help you learn more about the prehistoric people who lived in the area over 800 years ago! Once completed, mail the booklet back to the address on the website to receive your badge.
Point Reyes National Seashore, CA

Point Reyes National Seashore, CA

Become a Point Reyes Virtual Junior Ranger by downloading, printing, completing, and mailing in their Junior Ranger booklet to receive your badge. You will be able to explore the history of the Coast Miwok people and study the park's marine life. You can also become an Underwater Explorer Junior Ranger by downloading and completing the Underwater Explorer Junior Ranger activity booklet.

 

 

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